MSACL 2018 US Abstract

Topic: Metabolomics

Innovations for Direct Tissue Analysis and Imaging with Mass Spectrometry

Richard Yost (Presenter)
University of Florida

Bio: Dr. Yost is the Crow Professor and Head of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Florida. He may be best known for inventing (as a graduate student with Chris Enke at Michigan State) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, which 40 years later represents over $1B in sales each year. Dr. Yost has supervised the research of over 110 graduate students and has served as PI or Co-PI on grants and contracts totaling over $60M. Research in the group has led to over 180 publications and 16 patents. He is an Affiliate Professor of Pathology at both the University of Florida and the University of Utah/ARUP. His research has been recognized with the highest award in his discipline, the 1993 ASMS Award for Distinguished Contribution in Mass Spectrometry. He currently serves as the Vice President for Programs of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

Authorship: Louis Searcy, Emily L. Gill, Michelle Reid, Timothy J. Garrett, and Richard A Yost
University of Florida

Short Abstract

Direct analysis of tissue by mass spectrometry, including extensions to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI), permits rapid and direct analysis of tissue (when an image is not of interest) as well as providing a level of chemical information unmatched by any other imaging modality (including histopathology, MRI, and PET scans). This presentation will explore innovations in direct tissue analysis and MSI, focusing on new sampling methods (including real-time in situ microextraction using the flowprobe and desorption electrospray, and MALDI) and strategies for increasing the speed, spatial resolution, information content, and quantitative performance of the methods.

Long Abstract

Introduction

Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has evolved over the past decade into an invaluable technique for characterizing biological tissue and localizing metabolites, lipids, peptides and proteins. MSI takes advantage of the remarkable sensitivity and selectivity of mass spectrometry (including high revolution MS and tandem mass spec (MS/MS and MSn) to provide a level of chemical information unmatched by any other imaging modality (including histopathology, MRI, and PET scans). Furthermore, MSI can yield insight into hundreds of analytes in a single analysis, without labeling. Even when a chemical “image” is not of interest, MSI techniques can provide rapid and direct analysis of tissue, including samples too small for classic GC/MS or LC/MS analysis.

Methods

This presentation will explore innovations in MSI and direct tissue analysis, focusing on new sampling methods (including real-time in situ microextraction using the flowprobe, desorption electrospray or DESI, and MALDOI) and strategies for increasing the speed, spatial resolution, information content, and quantitative performance of the methods.

Results

This presentation will present data for a variety of applications, focusing on characterization and biomarker detection in a variety of diseased states. These studies will include the potential for rapid screening for skin cancer (melanoma), metabolomic studies of the effects of exercise on muscle, and investigation of treatment modalities in diseases such as Parkinson’s.

Data will be presented reflecting improvements in the speed, spatial resolution, information content, and quantitative performance of the methods, with a focus on the flowprobe technique. Detailed results will be presented on characterization and biomarker detection for rapid screening for melanoma, metabolomic studies of the effects of exercise on muscle, and investigation of deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

Conclusions & Discussion

Direct mass spectrometric analysis of tissue and imaging fer significant potential to improve metabolomic and clinical studies, as will be demonstrated in this presentation.


References & Acknowledgements:

The authors acknowledge the support of NIH (Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics, U24 DK097209, as well as support from Prosolia.


Financial Disclosure

DescriptionY/NSource
GrantsyesProsolia
Salaryno
Board Memberno
Stockno
Expensesno

IP Royalty: no

Planning to mention or discuss specific products or technology of the company(ies) listed above:

yes