Poster Program in Build Stage through February 10, 2023 MSACL 2023 Program

MSACL 2023 : Conference Program

Monterey, CA • April 2-7, 2023

2023 Sponsors

Abstract Clinical Use Status Key
= Emerging. More than 5 years before clinical availability. (24.68%)
= Expected to be clinically available in 1 to 4 years. (38.30%)
= Clinically available now. (37.02%)


Sunday

Sunday
1600
1800
Reg Desk Open for Early Badge Pick-Up
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2044
Sunday
1700
1830
Short Course : LC-MSMS 101 : Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MSMS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
@ Colton

Judy Stone, MT (ASCP), PhD, DABCC
UCSF

Jacqueline Hubbard, PhD, DABCC
Three Rivers Diagnostics

Grace van der Gugten
Government of Alberta, Medical Examiner's Office

Lorin Bachmann, PhD, DABCC
VCU Health System

Deborah French, PhD
UCSF

Adina Badea, PhD, DABCC
Lifespan Health/Rhode Island Hospital & the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Raymond Suhandynata, PhD DABCC
University of California, San Diego


IN-PERSON (Judy Stone, Jacqueline Hubbard) & ON-LINE (Grace van der Gugten, Deborah French, Lorin Bachmann)

REGISTER FOR VIRTUAL LC-MSMS 101 -- this virtual course will take place with the MSACL 2023 Monterey students who are onsite, except that you will have three online guides (Grace van der Gugten, Lorin Bachmann and Deborah French).

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Sunday 17:00 - 18:30 (1.5 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 4 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 5 : Tuesday 13:30 - 16:00 (2.5 h)

Total Contact Hours: 16.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

---------------

Pre-requisites

Interested in a detailed, practical introduction to clinical quantitative LCMS Overview

Is your laboratory under pressure to purchase an LC-tandem MS or is the ROI you wrote last year haunting you now? This short course is designed for attendees implementing quantitative LC-tandem MS for patient testing who have laboratory medicine experience but no mass spectrometry training - CLS bench analysts, supervisors, R&D scientists, and laboratory directors. Theoretical concepts necessary for a robust implementation of clinical mass spectrometry will be presented – but the emphasis is on practical recommendations for:

  1. LC-MS/MS system purchasing
  2. site preparation and installation
  3. defining preliminary MSMS and LC parameters for your first method
  4. selecting and optimizing sample preparation for your first method
  5. choosing internal standards, solvents, and water, making reagents and calibrators
  6. adjusting sample preparation, LC and MSMS parameters to achieve the desired assay performance
  7. establishing data analysis & review criteria and an interface to the LIS
  8. pre-validation stress testing and method validation
  9. preventative maintenance and troubleshooting
  10. maintaining quality in production
2074

Monday

Monday
600
700
Morning Sunrise Activity
@ Ferrantes
2081
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : Data Science 101 : Breaking up with Excel: An Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
@ Steinbeck 1

Daniel Holmes, MD, FRCPC
St. Paul’s Hospital

Dustin Bunch, PhD, DABCC
Nationwide Children's Hospital


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

Segment 1 is also be available ONLINE (pre-recorded) if you can't make it in person.

----------

Does Excel lag on you when you open a file bigger than 1000 rows? Has it ever changed your data to a date against your will? Are you ready to jump right past Tableau and into the world of Data Science using a real programming language?

Well, your wait is over because at MSACL we again will be offering a course for complete programming newbies that will help you get going analyzing real data related to LC-MS/MS assay development, validation, implementation and publication.

The only background expected is the ability to use a spreadsheet program. The skills that you will acquire will allow you to take advantage of the many tools already available in the R language and thereafter, when you see that your spreadsheet program does not have the capabilities to do what you need, you will no longer have to burst into tears.

The course will be run over three days (one in person to start and two online later) and time will be evenly split between didactic sessions and hands on problem solving with real data sets. Drs Holmes and Bunch will adopt a “no student left behind policy”. Students will be given ample time to solve mini problems taken from real life laboratory work and focused on common laboratory tasks. All attendees will need to bring a laptop with the R language installed R Studio interface installed. Students may use Windows, Mac OSX or Linux environments. Both R and R studio are free and open-source. No cash required.

Students should be prepared for learning what computer programming is really like. This may involve some personal frustration but it will be worth it.

Obtaining the Software

!!! DOWNLOAD PROGRAM PACKAGES PRIOR TO ARRIVAL ONSITE !!! THERE WILL NOT BE OPEN INTERNET WIFI IN THE CONFERENCE CENTER.

!!! POWER : Make sure your computer is charged to hold power for 4 hrs, as power outlets may not be available.

Instructions for installing the R language are here: http://cran.r-project.org/
Instructions for installing R Studio are here: http://www.rstudio.com/

Course Description

The course will cover:

  1. The major types of R variables: vectors (numerical, character, logical), matrices, data frames and lists.
  2. The important classes: numeric, character, list and changing between them
  3. Importing data from Excel
  4. Dealing with non-numeric instrument data
  5. Manipulating and cleansing your data
  6. Exporting data to Excel-like format.
  7. Basics of tidyverse: dplyr, filter, mutate, join
  8. Regressions: ordinary least squares,Passing Bablok, Deming, weighted regressions.
  9. Non-linear regressions
  10. Looping: Doing things repeatedly
  11. group_by and summarize
  12. Writing your own functions
  13. Making highly customized figures with base plot or ggplot
  14. Putting it all together projects:
  15. Preparing method comparison regression and Bland Altman plots
  16. Preparing mass spectrometry data for upload to LIS.
2050
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : GlycoProteomics 101 : Clinical glyco(proteo)mics by mass spectrometry
@ Steinbeck 2

Guinevere Lageveen-Kammeijer, PhD
University of Groningen

Noortje de Haan, PhD
University of Copenhagen


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

----------

Summary:

Did you ever encounter glycans, but you -kind of- neglected them as they seemed too complicated to characterize? Or did you just perform a glycan release to make the analysis of your protein a lot easier? You have no idea how to interpret your data when a glycan is present? Fear no more! We are here to provide you with the basics in the field of mass spectrometric glycomics and glycoproteomics.

The course will start with a historical overview on glycan research (i.e. how did glycans work their way up to being acknowledged as important study objects) and we will guide you through the maze of different nomenclatures. Moreover, although glycans are well known for their complexity, we will reveal to you the “rules of glycan structures” based on known biosynthetic pathways. This will be followed by an in-depth discussion on glyco(proteo)mic mass spectrometric technologies and workflows. In addition, different sample preparation steps and data analysis approaches will be covered. We will close-up with a session about glycomic biomarker discovery.

The course will run over two days and time will be split between lectures and workshops (e.g. how do you recognize a glycan in a mass spectrum and how do you assign it). While not everything can be covered within these two days we will ensure that you will know your “glyco-basics” in the end. Moreover, participants are encouraged to submit any specific glyco-questions they have prior to the course and we will try to discuss them during the course. Objectives:

  1. Understand glycan nomenclature and biosynthesis to aid mass spectrometry data interpretation.
  2. Know what analytical method to choose for you specific glycomics experiment.
  3. Learn how to interpret MS1 and MS2 data of glycans and glycopeptides.
  4. Know what software to use to aid glyco(proteo)mics MS data processing.
2053
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : Sample Prep 201 : Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
@ Steinbeck 3

William Clarke, PhD, MBA, DABCC
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Mark Marzinke, PhD, DABCC, FAACC
The Johns Hopkins Hospital


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

----------

Summary:

This course will encompass various sample preparation approaches used for LC-MS assays. The course will highlight not only the importance of sample processing in the clinical laboratory environment, but also illustrate the “fit for purpose” application of processing techniques in clinical mass spectrometry. This course will also discuss the theory behind different specimen preparation methods, strengths and weaknesses of each approach, as well as opportunities for automation. The first section of the course will serve as a primer of the role of upfront sample management, utilizing examples in blood and urine specimen sources. There will also be an introduction to the application of LC-MS approaches in alternative matrices. The second section of the course will elaborate on the foundations established in the first half, and expand into newer technologies and automated alternatives for sample processing. Topics will be covered through lecture, Q&A, Case Studies, and small group exercises.

Topics covered include

  • Pain points in clinical LC-MS
  • Overview of specimen processing in laboratory medicine
  • Off-line and On-line sample processing
  • Analysis of blood and urine
  • Alternate body fluid specimens (e.g. CSF, breast milk, tissue, etc.)
  • Dried specimens as matrices
  • Automation of sample processing
Learning Objectives

After attending this short course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe various pain points and challenges in clinical LC-MS;
  2. Discuss the impact of various specimen preparation approaches on LC-MS assay performance;
  3. Implement a fit-for-purpose approach to selection of a specimen preparation approach in their laboratory practice;
  4. Describe alternative specimen types and their potential utility in clinical practice or research.
2059
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : LC-MSMS 101 : Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MSMS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
@ Colton

IN-PERSON & ON-LINE

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Sunday 17:00 - 18:30 (1.5 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 4 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 5 : Tuesday 13:30 - 16:00 (2.5 h)

Total Contact Hours: 16.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2074
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : Clinical Proteomics 101 : Clinical Proteomics
@ De Anza 2

Andy Hoofnagle, MD, PhD
University of Washington

Christopher Shuford, Ph.D.
Labcorp

Cory Bystrom, PhD
Ultragenyx


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

----------

Objective

The main goal of this course is to provide an interactive forum in which attendees will be introduced to critical aspects of clinical protein measurements. The topics of this course will be templated on the framework of CLIS guidance document, C64: Quantitative Measurement of Proteins and Peptides by Mass Spectrometry. Summary

The motivation for using mass spectrometry to quantify proteins in clinical research and in clinical care will be discussed as part of this interactive workshop. Technical topics uniquely affecting quantitative protein and peptides measurements by mass spectrometry will be a point of emphasis. Case studies from assay inception through validation will be presented and participants will work interactively to critique various aspects of clinical proteomic measurements. Syllabus

  1. Protein vs Peptide Measurands
  2. Workflows
  3. Sample Preparation (Digestion & Enrichment)
  4. Internal standards
  5. Calibration
  6. Validation
  7. Quality control
2066
Monday
800
1200
Short Course : LC-MSMS 201 : LC-MSMS Technology and Techniques in the Clinical Lab
@ De Anza 3

Robert Voyksner, PhD
LCMS Limited


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

----------

Summary

This course is designed for the chromatographer and /or mass spectrometrist who wants to be successful in developing methods, optimizing methods, troubleshooting methods and solving problems using LC-MSMS. The course covers the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) techniques of electrospray and gas phase ionization including atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photo ionization (APPI) using triple quadrupole, time-of-flight and quadrupole time of flight and orbit trap mass analyzers. Discussions of sample preparation and modes of chromatography will target method development and optimization for the analysis of “real-world” samples by LC/MS. The course highlights the following topics with respect to development and optimization of methods to achieve the best sensitivity, specificity, and sample throughput.

This course focuses on method development method trouble shooting and application for the analysis of both small and large molecules that are clinically relevant. All examples are taken from real-world analyses, performed by Dr. Voyksner at LCMS Limited. The concepts presented in the course are reinforced through numerous problem sets the attendees will work on throughout the 12 hour course.

The last part of the course is an open forum where each attendee is invited to share a current LC-MS/MS issue they face. As a class we work through potential solutions and experiments to be performed to find a solution to the student problem, applying the concepts taught in the class and Dr. Voyksner’s 40 plus years of experience in LC-MS/MS. From past classes this has been the attendee’s favorite part of the class.

Specific topics to be covered include

  1. Understanding API ionization processes for electrospray, APCI and APPI, what affects the ionization process and how to maximize the ionization for compounds of interest.
  2. Understanding the effects of LC columns (dimensions and particles size), flow rate, and mobile phases have upon the separation and LC/MS analysis.
  3. Determining the type of ions that can form by electrospray and APCI, how to interpret the MS and MS/MS spectra and approaches on how to perform qualitative analysis in LC-MS/MS and high-resolution MS/MS.
  4. Understanding important issues that affect quantitative analytical results and how to optimize the method to achieve the best performance, reduce matrix suppression, reduce background and generate the best accuracy and precision.
  5. Exploring what new techniques are available (e.g. direct analysis MS, chip method and MS instrumentation) that can improve the results one can obtain.
  6. Open forum discussing attendees’ specific problems they face in method development or analysis using LC-MS/MS.
2069
Monday
1200
1330
Lunch Break
@ Off-site
1990
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : Data Science 101 : Breaking up with Excel: An Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
@ Steinbeck 1

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2050
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : GlycoProteomics 101 : Clinical glyco(proteo)mics by mass spectrometry
@ Steinbeck 2

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2053
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : Sample Prep 201 : Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
@ Steinbeck 3

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2059
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : LC-MSMS 101 : Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MSMS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
@ Colton

IN-PERSON & ON-LINE

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Sunday 17:00 - 18:30 (1.5 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 4 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 5 : Tuesday 13:30 - 16:00 (2.5 h)

Total Contact Hours: 16.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2074
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : Data Science 201 : Flexing with R : Databases to Dashboards
@ Stevenson 2

Shannon Haymond, PhD
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Patrick Mathias, MD, PhD
University of Washington


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 8.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

------------

Pre-requisites

An introductory R course (including MSACL Data Science 101) and/or experience using R for data analysis

Objectives

To teach learners with a basic background with R how to organize data analysis projects reproducibly using tools such as Quarto, dashboards, and databases.

Summary

Do you have data files that you would like to accumulate over time into an organized, accessible format and then visualize different aspects of the combined data in an interactive, web-based dashboard? If so, this course is for you! Reproducibility is an important principle for making data analysis trustworthy and reliable. Automation enables users to scale their data analysis steps. The R programming language is one of many tools that can help users automate data analysis workflows while adopting best practices in reproducibility, but there are several packages to choose from when developing these skills. In this short course we will introduce a combination of workflows, packages, and tools that help learners set up data analysis projects, develop pipelines for extracting and storing data, and then develop interactive visualizations to gain understanding from the data. First, we will explain how to fully utilize the RStudio integrated development environment with Projects and how the renv package ensures that code consistently produces the same output no matter where or when it is run. Next, we will cover iterative file parsing and demonstrate how this can be linked to lightweight relational databases such as SQLite and DuckDB to build a pipeline for repetitive data loading over time. In the last portion of the course, we will discuss the Quarto scientific publishing system and related visualization tools such as the flexdashboard package. This short course will be interactive, with frequent short exercises to reinforce new concepts. Familiarity with the R programming language, either from an introductory course or self-learning, is highly recommended. Finally, concepts in this short course overlap material taught in previous intermediate R courses at MSACL, but here we will focus putting together the tools to develop reproducible, automated dashboards for visualization of laboratory data and provide updates to include some of the latest developments in the R ecosystem.

Syllabus / Topics covered

  1. Principles of reproducibility
  2. Pick up where you left off with RStudio tools
  3. Taking control of packages with renv
  4. File reading over and over and over
  5. Dude, where’s my data? Organizing data into relational databases
  6. Pulling out your dplyr to grab what you need
  7. Show off your skills with Quarto
  8. Flexing with some sweet dashboards
2063
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : Metabolomics 201 : Measuring Metabolism from Dried Blood Spots to Microsampling and more
@ De Anza 1

Tim Garrett, PhD
University of Florida College of Medicine

Donald Chace, PhD, MSFS, FACB
Capitainer


Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 8.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

------------

Objectives

(1) Advantages for using DBS and other microsampling techniques in clinical and metabolomics research, discovery, and applications,

(2) Strategies for maximizing analytical success with the mass spectrometer and DBS with examples of existing methods and successful applications.

(3) Understand the application of global metabolomics and targeted metabolomics to disease diagnostics.

Summary

DBS have been used for nearly 60 years in a clinical and research environment specifically in rare disease screening of newborns or health monitoring and treatment to restore a more “normal” metabolism. Although clinical chemistry workflows are still dominated by liquid blood or plasma and immunoassay platforms, they are not necessarily suitable for microsample collection as demonstrated in the choice for newborn screening (200-300 µL) versus 1-10 mL for a venous blood draw. Furthermore, a dried microsample offers better protection from infectious disease during sample handling, is less expensive to ship in the mail, may stabilize some molecules from degradation of active enzyme, light or heat, and has reduce storage requirements during and after sampling. Perhaps the biggest advantage that is now recognized in the “post” pandemic world is remote patient sampling in an ever-expanding telemedicine environment. This course will describe the advantages of filter paper for mass spec workflows in areas of sample cleanup, extraction, manipulation as well as examples of successful analysis. We will provide examples of existing method in use in clinical analysis. As important are its advantages, we will discuss limitations from the lack of precision of classic Guthrie cards because of volume uncertainties to the problems of some mass spectrometry analysis of molecules like proteins. Finally we will correlate these issues with the ever expanding area of metabolomics, how research might benefit from small microsamples and remote sample collection especially on diseases that are rare in a patient that might be a continent away.

Topics covered

  1. Metabolomics/Metabolism
    • Global analysis (HRMS, HRMS/MS)
    • Targeted analysis (SRM, MRM, NL, PS)
    • Rare disease diagnosis
  2. Dried blood spots/microsampling
    • Collection
    • Extraction
    • Quantitation
    • Comparisons to other matrices (plasma/serum, urine, whole blood)
    • Tips/tricks
  3. Future perspectives
    • New collection devices
    • New approaches
    • Standardization/QA/QC
    • Precision/telemedicine
2061
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : Clinical Proteomics 101 : Clinical Proteomics
@ De Anza 2

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2066
Monday
1330
1730
Short Course : LC-MSMS 201 : LC-MSMS Technology and Techniques in the Clinical Lab
@ De Anza 3

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2069
Monday
1730
1830
Happy Hour
@ Steinbeck Foyer
1991
Monday
1800
2400
MSACL Hospitality Lounge
@ Club Room
1989

Tuesday

Tuesday
600
700
Morning Sunrise Activity
@ Ferrantes
2082
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : Data Science 101 : Breaking up with Excel: An Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
@ Steinbeck 1

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2050
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : GlycoProteomics 101 : Clinical glyco(proteo)mics by mass spectrometry
@ Steinbeck 2

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2053
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : Sample Prep 201 : Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
@ Steinbeck 3

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2059
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : LC-MSMS 101 : Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MSMS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
@ Colton

IN-PERSON & ON-LINE

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Sunday 17:00 - 18:30 (1.5 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 4 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 5 : Tuesday 13:30 - 16:00 (2.5 h)

Total Contact Hours: 16.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2074
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : Data Science 201 : Flexing with R : Databases to Dashboards
@ Stevenson 2

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 8.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2063
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : Metabolomics 201 : Measuring Metabolism from Dried Blood Spots to Microsampling and more
@ De Anza 1

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 8.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2061
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : Clinical Proteomics 101 : Clinical Proteomics
@ De Anza 2

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2066
Tuesday
800
1200
Short Course : LC-MSMS 201 : LC-MSMS Technology and Techniques in the Clinical Lab
@ De Anza 3

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)

Total Contact Hours: 12.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

2069
Tuesday
1200
1330
Lunch Break
@ Off-site
1993
Tuesday
1330
1600
Workshop : Ion Mobility: How to Get it into YOUR Lab
@ Steinbeck 1

Christopher Chouinard, PhD
Clemson University

Robin Kemperman, PhD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


Objective

Attendees will learn the basic principles of ion mobility, benefits and challenges to routine implementation in the clinical lab, method development, and current applications.

Summary

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has become a cornerstone of biomedical analysis, with applications ranging from isomeric small molecule differentiation to the study of protein structure. Despite its advantages, IM-MS has yet to see routine implementation in the clinical lab due to challenges in quantitation, limited universal standards, data processing software, and reproducibility across different IM techniques/vendor platforms. This workshop will introduce common IM techniques and their operating principles, expanding upon the benefits of incorporating IM into conventional LC-MS/MS workflows and discussing its challenges. A discussion of method design and development will focus on how users might go about integrating IM into their existing (or new) assays. Finally, an overview of current applications (including metabolomics, lipidomics, and proteomics examples) will be provided.

Objective 1: Understand the basic operating principles of IMS and the differences between the different techniques (e.g., drift tube, traveling wave, FAIMS/DMS, etc.)
Objective 2: Recognize the benefits and limitations to incorporating IMS into conventional LC-MS/MS workflows in the clinic
Objective 3: Become familiar with method design and development and current/future applications

Syllabus

  • Basic Operating Conditions of IMS: Electric field application, experimental conditions (temperature, pressure, gas composition)
  • Different IMS techniques: Drift tube/traveling wave, field asymmetric/differential mobility, emerging techniques (i.e., TIMS, SLIM, cIMS, etc.)
  • Applications: Current examples from metabolomics, lipidomics, and proteomics
2079
Tuesday
1330
1600
Workshop : Design of Experiments for Optimization of LC-MS Clinical Assays
@ Steinbeck 2

Margret Thorsteinsdottir, PhD
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland

Finnur Eiriksson, PhD
ArticMass


Objectives

The objective of the workshop is to provide an introduction into design of experiments (DoE) for clinical application with special focus on optimization of MS-based clinical assays. The workshop is focused on practical implementation of DoE and will demonstrate how method development of sample preparation and UPLC-MS/MS method for quantification of clinical biomarkers can become much more efficient by utilizing DoE.

Summary

Design of experiments (DoE) is an efficient tool for development and optimization of UPLC-MS/MS platform for quantification of biomarkers in complex biological matrices. The UPLC-MS/MS platform is composed of several processes which involve many experimental factors that need to be simultaneously optimized to obtain a true maximum sensitivity with adequate resolution at minimum retention time. DoE offers a practical approach for performing experiments in accordance with a predefined plan, modelling by empirical functions, and graphical visualization. Basic concept of DoE will be presented with emphasis on practical implementation of DoE which includes the three main stages, screening, optimization, and robustness testing. To demonstrate the cost-effective benefit of DoE, which allows the effect of variables to be assessed with only a fraction of the experiments that would be required by changing one-separate-factor-at-time (COST) approach, two case studies will be presented. The first case is optimization of sample preparation in bottom-up targeted protein LC-MS workflow using DoE. The second case is an optimization of a UPLC-MS/MS assay for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic drug monitoring of patients with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, which is an inborn error of purine metabolism. A polynomial model which corresponds to the objective of the case study is specified and an experimental design that supports the selected model is generated. Significant factors were studied via central composite design and related to responses utilizing partial least square (PLS)-regression. Both cases showed that DoE is an excellent tool for optimization of sample preparation for biological samples and UPLC-MS/MS quantification method for clinical biomarkers. A significant reduction of sample preparation time was achieved with increased yields for selected peptides and a reliable UPLC-MS/MS assay for simultaneous quantification of urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) and adenine was optimized efficiently with DoE.

Syllabus

  • Design of Experiments (DoE) – Get it right from the beginning
  • Basic concept and assessment of DoE
  • Optimization of sample preparation and UPLC-MS/MS clinical assay by DoE
1995
Tuesday
1330
1600
Workshop : The Value, Impact, and Regulatory Landscape of Laboratory Developed Tests
@ Steinbeck 3

Melissa Budelier, PhD
TriCore Reference Laboratories

Jacqueline Hubbard, PhD, DABCC
Three Rivers Diagnostics


Objectives

  • Recognize the role of laboratory developed tests (LDTs) in patient care
  • Describe the current regulatory landscape of LDTs
  • Define the VALID act and discuss its potential implications to the practice of laboratory medicine and patient care

Summary

Laboratory Developed Tests (LDTs) play a critical role in patient care. They are developed by expert laboratorians to bridge gaps between patient needs and available FDA-approved assays. LDTs are used to help diagnose and manage treatment for a variety of health conditions. These tests undergo extensive validation prior to implementation and, within the United States, are federally regulated by CLIA. The proposed Verifying Accurate Leading-edge IVCT Development Act of 2022 (“VALID Act”) includes additional regulation of LDTs by the FDA. If passed, the VALID Act would limit LDT access and the ability to provide timely laboratory testing to providers and patients, resulting in significant care gaps.

This interactive workshop will provide an overview on what LDTs are, how they are validated and the current regulatory framework, highlighting papers published in the recent JMSACL special issue – Laboratory Developed Tests: Regulation, Assay Development, and Impact on Patient Care. We’ll also provide an overview on the status and potential implications of the VALID act. In the second half of the workshop, the audience will have a chance to share their opinions, questions, and concerns in a flipped classroom Q & A.

2080
Tuesday
1330
1600
Short Course : LC-MSMS 101 : Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MSMS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
@ Colton

IN-PERSON & ON-LINE

Course Schedule

Segment 1 : Sunday 17:00 - 18:30 (1.5 h)
Segment 2 : Monday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 3 : Monday 13:30 - 17:30 (4 h)
Segment 4 : Tuesday 08:00 - 12:00 (4 h)
Segment 5 : Tuesday 13:30 - 16:00 (2.5 h)

Total Contact Hours: 16.00 (ACCENT CE PROVIDED)

NOTE: THIS OCCURS AT THE SAME TIME as the WORKSHOPS.

2074
Tuesday
1330
1600
Workshop : Pre-Analytical Considerations as Prerequisite for Successful Clinical Application of Lipidomics
@ Stevenson 1

Robert Gurke, PhD
Fraunhofer Institute for Translational Medicine and Pharmacology Itmp

Anne K. Bendt, PhD
Singapore Lipidomics Incubator (SLING), National University of Singapore

Bo Burla, PhD
Sling @ National University of Singapore


Objectives

It is the objective of the workshop to provide an introduction into pre-analytical considerations for clinical application of MS-based analytics, with a special focus on lipids. However, these considerations are in many cases independent of specific analytes of interest and can hence be applied for polar metabolites as well as proteins. The workshop is focused on main hurdles to be considered when performing clinical research using LC-MS based determination of lipids namely: (I) pre-analytical sample handling, (II) frequent generation of patient samples as well as (III) overall cohort and study design.

Summary

Lipids are involved in a broad spectrum of functionalities in the organism and implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Changes in lipid levels are promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis of disease progression, or guidance for selecting promising therapeutic approaches. However, biomarker discovery in the field of lipidomics is a very challenging process since lipids require specific procedures regarding sampling (including selection of sample type and collection procedures, storage conditions and number of freeze-thaw cycles), sample preparation and analysis for reliable determination. As especially pre-analytical sample handling is a critical step for the reliable analysis of the lipidome, a close cooperation with the clinicians is necessary. This ensures following a highly standardized protocol for venous blood sampling to avoid several pre-analytical pitfalls potentially changing the lipid profile ex vivo. As collecting venous blood samples is very laborious for patients as well as clinicians, other ways for a more frequent sample collection are necessary. Therefore, capillary blood sampling using microsampling devices is an auspicious way to complement the strategy of analyzing venous blood-based samples taken in the clinics. Besides considering the right sampling strategy, the structured recording of sampling details and subject metadata, the overall planning of the study and also the cohorts to be included is of high relevance. All mentioned points have to be considered before starting a clinical research project applying lipidomics to generate high quality data making biomarker discovery possible.

2078
Tuesday
1330
1600
Workshop : Surgical Mass Spectrometry - Delivering the Technology to the Operating Room
@ Stevenson 2

Zoltan Takats, PhD
Imperial College


Objectives

The objective of the workshop is to identify and overcome potential roadblocks preventing mass spectrometry-guided surgery to become routinely used in the clinical interventional world. The workshop will focus on the side-by-side comparison of existing technology and clinical needs, as also on the embedding of the technology into existing healthcare settings and regulatory aspects. The workshop is envisioned to outline the strategy for the clinical translation of these technologies.

Summary

The need for in-situ, real-time tissue identification has been dramatically increasing with the development and deployment of robotic and other high-precision surgical approaches. While surgical mass spectrometry techniques have been continuously developed, published and demonstrated in human surgical environment, none of these approaches have reached regulatory approval and routine application in surgery. We are planning to use the meeting to understand where the roadblocks are and how we can get around them to deliver the technology for patients and healthcare professionals equally needing it. The workshop is envisioned to map out the current technology landscape and identify the strengths and weaknesses of each solution together with their respective low-hanging fruit applications as the first main topic. This mapping exercise will be followed by discussing the embedding of the approach both into existing oncology and clinical diagnostic systems. The approach is expected to change how interventional cancer care (and potentially a few other treatments) is delivered, hence it is of utmost importance to understand this aspect from the point of view of pathologists, oncologists and medical imaging professionals. Furthermore, the technology will also be the forerunner of a universal, mass spectrometry-based diagnostic system, bringing LC-MS and MS imaging experts to the table. Beyond the embedding of the technology, we are also keen to discuss the regulatory and health economic aspects of the approach in the third part of the workshop.

Syllabus/Topics

  • Surgical mass spectrometry methods – strengths, weaknesses, applications and future perspectives
  • Embedding of technology into healthcare systems. Interactions with oncology, pathology, imaging and clinical chemistry. Synergism with other MS-based diagnostic technologies.
  • Regulatory and health economics aspects
2090
Tuesday
1600
1630
Coffee Break & Happy Half Hour
@ Steinbeck Foyer
1997
Tuesday
1630
1650
Welcome & Scientific Orientation
@ Steinbeck
1996
Tuesday
1650
1730
The Michael S. Bereman Award for Innovative Clinical Proteomics : Translating Multiplexed Proteomic Assays to the Clinic and Beyond: Lessons from a Road Less Traveled
@ Steinbeck

Timothy Collier, PhD
Quest Diagnostics

Sponsored by:


MICHAEL S. BEREMAN AWARD LECTURE

The process of translating mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic assays from basic research to the clinical laboratory remains a significant challenge for many laboratorians. The road to using innovative assays to aid in patient treatment is often fraught with obstacles, be they technical, financial, or regulatory. Over the past several years, our laboratory has had success in the research and development, validation, and commercialization of a multi-marker assay of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)–associated proteins. The validated clinical assay provides insight into a patient’s cholesterol efflux capacity (the ability of HDL cholesterol to transport cholesterol away from the artery wall). The assay helps assess the patient’s risk for developing coronary artery disease and, ultimately, cardiovascular death. The assay is also a component in several clinical studies to further assess its utility. Furthermore, the research framework upon which this assay was designed continues to yield new insights into other pathologies, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In this presentation I will summarize our efforts, our successes, and lessons learned on the road from basic research to clinical deployment.

Moderated by:

Mari DeMarco, PhD, DABCC, FACB, FCACB
University of British Columbia

1998
Tuesday
1740
1830
Distinguished Contribution Award Plenary
@ Steinbeck

Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute

Moderated by:

Ravinder Singh, PhD
Mayo Clinic

Gwen McMillin, PhD
University of Utah and ARUP

2075
Tuesday
1830
2100
Opening Exhibits Reception
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
1999
Tuesday
2100
2400
MSACL Lounge
@ Club Room
2046

Wednesday

Wednesday
600
700
Morning Sunrise Activity
@ Ferrantes
2083
Wednesday
700
800

Industry Workshop(s)

Thermo Fisher Scientific
@ Steinbeck 1

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Indigo BioAutomation
@ Steinbeck 2

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Waters
@ Steinbeck 3

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Wednesday
800
845
Coffee Hour
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra

Visit the Exhibit Hall for a relaxed tour of the posters and Exhibits while enjoying your morning coffee.
2087
Wednesday
800
845
Coffee Roundtables
@ Steinbeck Foyer

Mark Kushnir, PhD
ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology

Hsuan-Chieh (Joyce) Liao, PhD, NRCC, DABCC
University of Washington

Liang Li, PhD
Metabolomics Innovation Centre of Canada & University of Alberta

Adam McShane, PhD
Cleveland Clinic


1. Is There a Better Way to Plan and Perform Experiments? Introduction to Experimental Design
Mark Kushnir

Experimental design (DOE) is a technique that allows to be more efficient in planning, conducting and interpreting results of experiments. In Analytical Chemistry, DOE can be used during method development and optimization, troubleshooting performance and method evaluation. The DOE technique is also very helpful for identifying critical parameters, which have the most significant effect on performance of the methods, products, processes, or systems. The participants will learn why DOE is better than performing experiments by changing one variable at a time, learn about cause-and-effect relationships and interactions between factors. The participants will be introduced to several types of DOE, will learn some of the principles and guidelines for planning experiments.

2. Do Identical Instruments Produce Comparable Patient Results? A Stumbling Block of Harmonizing LC-MS/MS Assays in Clinical Laboratories
Joyce Liao

Clinical mass spectrometry laboratories usually validate individual assays on more than one instrument for continuous operation. Instrument comparison is a requirement of the College of American Pathologists and should be monitored at least twice a year to ensure comparability of results. Although the same style of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system is preferred to minimize the variations between instruments, labs will inevitably encounter bias between two or more identical LC-MS/MS systems. Even in the absence of bias, the same instrument model with two different serial numbers may require different instrument settings to obtain similar sensitivity and specificity. In this roundtable session, we will review several comparison data sets from the same extractions injected and analyzed on two LC-MS/MS systems of the same make and model. We will discuss the potential factors, including mass spectrometer hardware (probe type and cleanness) and software settings (gradients, transitions, cone voltages, and collision energies) that could bias patient results and how to establish quality assurance policies to ensure adequate data review and accurate resulting. Examples of challenges we have faced and approaches we have found useful will be presented as a starting point for discussion.

3. Challenges and Possible Solutions on Direct Metabolome Profiling for Clinical Applications
Liang Li

Metabolomics is mainly used for disease biomarker discovery with an objective of translating newly discovered metabolite biomarkers into clinical applications. On the other hand, direct metabolome profiling of human biofluids may be used for monitoring health status of individuals on a population scale. However, there are a number of challenges in realizing this goal. This roundtable discussion will focus on exchanging views on several key areas of technical development that are needed to bring large-scale metabolome profiling to clinical settings. These include sample type, sample handling, analytical platforms, data processing, clinical metabolome informatics, cost and scale, etc.

4. Thyroid Function Testing Interference and How Mass Spectrometry Can Help: Interactive Case Studies
Adam McShane

Thyroid disease affects approximately 20 million Americans, and can lead to a multitude of symptoms. These are often grouped into 2 categories: hyperthyroidism (e.g., anxiety, weight loss, and sleep loss) and hypothyroidism (e.g. fatigue, weight gain, and forgetfulness). Clinicians rely heavily on biochemical assessment of the thyroid for accurate diagnosis to ensure prompt treatment. Routine thyroid function tests utilize immunoassays for their availability, speed, and automation. However, this testing suffers from a variety of interferences which can delay diagnosis or worse lead to miss diagnosis. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a much more specific platform than immunoassays that can be utilized in the investigation of potential inferences. This session will utilize real-life, interactive cases to exemplify common thyroid function testing interferences, investigatory considerations, and how LC-MS can be utilized.

2000
Wednesday
845
935
Molecular Phenomics in Systems, Synthetic, and Chemical Biology
@ Steinbeck

John A. McLean, Ph.D.
Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University


The human genome project is recognized as being one of the most successful big science projects in modern history. One of the primary motivational underpinnings to undertake the HGP was to better understand what made us human and healthy - and how to use this code to improve the human condition by better understanding disease and potential treatment. While the frontiers of our knowledge expanded dramatically, we also uncovered profound biological complexity that we could not understand. This led to the current frontier in the measurement science of molecular phenomics, to catalog the broad-scale changes in the molecular inventory in cells, tissues, and biological fluids at a specific biological state, or in response to exposures and lifestyle choices. In phenomics, we seek to characterize the comprehensive molecular basis of biology (including DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, metabolites, and all of their nuances), in both space (e.g. at a cell, tissue, and organismal level) and time (e.g. healthy versus disease state). This places enormous demands on measurement technologies (including minimal sample preparation, fast measurements, high concentration dynamic range, low limits of detection, and high selectivity) and computational approaches to organize the millions of potential species present in vanishingly small spatial coordinates. The interplay between phenomic datasets and bioinformatics forms the nexus of translating phenomics data into actionable information and understanding. Advances in computational biology rely heavily on the experimental capacity to make omics measurements, i.e. integrated proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, glycomics, among many others. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) provides rapid (ms) gas-phase electrophoretic separations on the basis of molecular structure and is well suited for integration with rapid (us) mass spectrometry detection techniques. This report will describe the fundamental strategies for IM separations and recent advances in IM-MS integrated omics measurement strategies in the analyses of complex biological samples of interest in systems, synthetic, and chemical biology. New advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning based on developments in internet commerce and astronomy will also be described to approach biological queries from an unbiased and untargeted perspective and to quickly mine these massive datasets. These techniques will be highlighted through selected examples ranging from clinical applications of targeted panels, to the creation of microfluidic human-organs-on-chip to replace animal testing in drug development workflows, to probing the outcomes of fast genetic editing experiments (using CRISPR) in the optimization of synthetic biology for fine and commodity chemical production to potential advances in clinical measurements. While enormous challenges remain, the promise is immense – comprehensive diagnostics and predictive capabilities for health and medicine of importance to society and beyond.

Moderated by:

Christopher Chouinard, PhD
Clemson University

2002
Wednesday
935
945
Intermission
@ Steinbeck Foyer
2004
Wednesday
945
1020
Advancing Neuroscience Research via Novel Application of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry (IM-MS)
@ Steinbeck

Lingjun Li, PhD
School of Pharmacy and Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin - Madison


Naturally occurring D-amino acid substitution, also known as amino acid D-isomerization, has been observed in many disease-associated peptides and proteins, including amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the putative biomarkers and drug targets for Alzheimer’s disease. Aβ is of significant interest due to the prevalence of post-translational D-isomerization in AD brain samples. While many prior reports have described technical advancements associated with the chiral discrimination and separation of D-amino acid containing peptides, there remains a dearth of tools capable of targeting Aβ42 stereochemistry. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has increasingly become an important alternative for the chiral separation of Aβ stereoisomers. IM-MS offers high analytical speed, low sample consumption and the ability to resolve small structural differences in peptide analytes, driven by recent technological advancements in IM-MS. In this talk, I will present a multi-dimensional IM-MS-based structural analysis strategy to facilitate the study of the chiral effects on monomer structure, oligomeric propensity, and receptor binding for Aβ peptides. Furthermore, analytical strategies to enhance peptide epimer differentiation and for site-specific localization of D-amino acid containing peptides will be presented. Finally, I will discuss our recent efforts in developing a high-resolution ion mobility-enabled sn-position resolved lipidomics strategy for probing phospholipid dysregulation in the brain of a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease.

Moderated by:

Christopher Chouinard, PhD
Clemson University

2003
Wednesday
1025
1100
Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Understanding the Chemistry in the Mass Spectrometer and How That Affects What Is Detected
@ Steinbeck

Gary Glish, PhD
University of North Carolina


Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry (DIMS) is a powerful tool that can help improve targeted detection of analytes using mass spectrometry (MS). DIMS has a number of advantages over more conventional drift type ion mobility techniques, but currently lacks the ability to determine collisional cross-sections. Some of the advantages of DIMS are: it is readily compatible with any type of mass analyzer; it is more orthogonal to MS because the separation is not based just on cross-section; and gas phase chemistry can be used to dramatically affect separation of analytes that are isomeric/isobaric and even have the same cross-section. A very under-appreciated aspect of DIMS is its ability to provide insight into the ionization chemistry and how that chemistry can significantly distort the resulting mass spectrum. This presentation will provide an overview of DIMS, examples of improvement of targeted analysis using DIMS with and without gas phase chemistry, and examples of how DIMS can provide understanding of chemistry occurring in the mass spectrometry experiment that can lead to inaccurate conclusions.

Moderated by:

Christopher Chouinard, PhD
Clemson University

2077
Wednesday
1100
1230
Poster Session 1
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2005
Wednesday
1130
1330
Lunch Buffet
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2007
Wednesday
1230
1400
Poster Session 2
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2006

Scientific Session 1

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Adding Value in Standardization of Proteomics Assays

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Lipidomics Biomarkers

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Toxicology/TDM

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1400
1420
A Simplified Proteomics LC-MRM-MS Assay for Determination of ApoE Genotypes in Plasma Samples
Deema Qasrawi
Mcgill University-Lady Davis Institute
Extracellular Vesicles Are a Source of Lipid Biomarkers for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis
Erika Dorado
Imperial College London
Evaluation of Analytical Techniques for Drug Checking
John Halifax
UCSF
How To Achieve Lower Quantification Limits
Russell Grant
Labcorp
1420
1440
Lessons in Calibration: Peptide versus Protein Based Calibrators
Meng Wang
University of British Columbia
Comprehensive Correlation Analysis of Tumours, Their Metastases and Established Primary Cell Lines by Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Adrienn Molnár
Waters Research Center, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University
Multiplexed Quantification of Venlafaxine and Four Metabolites in Human Plasma
Claire Knezevic
Johns Hopkins University
...
Extended Session
...
1440
1500
Towards a Who-IFCC Traceable LC-MS/MS-based Assay for Isoform-independent Measurement of Lipoprotein(a)
Ryan Pearce
Quest Diagnostics
Lipidomics and Biobanking: Challenges of Pre-Analytical Sample Handling
Lisa Hahnefeld
Fraunhofer Institute for Translational Medicine and Pharmacology ITMP, Frankfurt, Germany; Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ Zafes, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany
Optimized UPLC-MS/MS Assay for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Patients with Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Deficiency
Margret Thorsteinsdottir
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland
...
Extended Session
...
Wednesday
1500
1530
Coffee Break
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2012

Scientific Session 2

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Emerging Technologies for PoC Dx

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Strategies in Lipidomic Assay Design

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Immunology

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1530
1550
Multi-Site Development of a Real-Time Breast Cancer Recognition and Tumor Metabolic Phenotyping Platform Using Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Julia Balog
Waters Research Center
Evaluating Matrix-Specific Adduct Formation for Improved Quantitative Accuracy in Nontargeted Lipidomics
Lauren Bishop
University of California, Davis
Redefining Serological Diagnostics with Immunoaffinity Proteomics
Andrei Drabovich
University of Alberta
Data Automation: From Crawling to Running
Dustin Bunch, Daniel Holmes, Patrick Mathias
Nationwide Children's Hospital, St. Paul’s Hospital, University of Washington
1550
1610
Direct Swab Analysis by Desorption Electrospray Ionisation – Mass Spectrometry for Preterm Birth Risk Stratification in Patients with Cervical Shortening
Katia Capuccini
Imperial College London
Comparison of a Novel Lipid-based MALDI-TOF MS Technique to Two FDA-cleared Direct from Blood Culture Diagnostics
Richard Smith
University of Maryland
Multiplexed Targeted LC-MS/MS Assay to Determine Immune Response to a Panel of Winter Viruses
Dan Lane
University of Leicester
...
Extended Session
...
1610
1630
Rapid and Sensitive Protein Quantitation in Biofluids by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry: Single Instrument Albumin/Creatinine Ratio Measurements
Chris Gill
Vancouver Island University
Cutting Through the Fat(s) in Clinical Fatty Acid GC-MS Analysis: Analytical Accuracy or Clinical Concordance?
Matthew Crawford
Labcorp
Alteration of Human Immunoglobulin Fc-glycosylation Among Chronic Dialysis Patients After SARS-Cov-2 Vaccination Booster and/or Infection with LC-MSMS Analysis
Chia Yi Chou
Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
...
Extended Session
...
Wednesday
1630
1645
Intermission
@ Steinbeck Foyer
2017
Wednesday
1645
1800
Discussion : Tackling Tough Issues in Toxicology LC-MS/MS Method Development
@ Steinbeck 1

Hsuan-Chieh (Joyce) Liao, PhD, NRCC, DABCC
University of Washington

Joshua Hayden, PhD, DABCC, FACB
Norton Healthcare

Heather Stieglitz, PhD, DABCC
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center


Confirmatory urine drug testing by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) remains a corner stone of clinical mass spectrometry testing. This testing offers significant financial and patient care advantages and thus represents an excellent opportunity for new labs looking to establish or expand their LC-MS/MS testing. A clinical laboratory aiming to setup such testing will be faced with what can seem like an overwhelming number of options and decisions, especially if the laboratory is new or has limited experience with LC-MS/MS testing. This interest group discussion aims to help labs navigate these complex decisions by highlighting some approaches used by three clinical chemists who oversee toxicology testing at three medical centers. Topics that will be discussed include 1. choosing what drug classes and analytes (parent drug, metabolites, etc) to include, 2. whether to detect conjugated or unconjugated drugs, and 3. determining appropriate measuring and reportable intervals. This interactive session will begin with an introduction of the topic using case examples of how each speaker approached the issue followed by an open discussion with the audience on the advantages and limitations of different approaches.
2076
Wednesday
1645
1800
Discussion : Job Fair
@ Steinbeck 2
2089
Wednesday
1645
1800
Discussion : Use of Reference Materials for Calibration and Validation in Clinical Mass Spectrometry Applications
@ Colton

Johanna Camara, PhD
NIST


Reference materials (RMs), including certified reference materials (CRMs), are provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and other RM producers to support global clinical measurement standardization. These materials are available in various forms, including neat powders, solutions, and clinical matrices. The intended RM uses include calibration and validation, depending on the material. Calibration with RMs may provide traceability to higher-order references when incorporated into specific measurement schemes. The choice of which RM to use and how to incorporate it into a measurement system depends on laboratory goals. This roundtable is designed to discuss RM production, availability, and options for incorporating RMs into clinical laboratory measurement applications. Many RMs are ideally suited for mass spectrometry-based measurement procedures. Many matrix matched RMs (blood serum, plasma, urine) are value assigned based on mass spectrometry-based Reference Measurement Procedures (RMPs). These RMPs typically separate and quantify individual metabolites, epimers, or other chemical variations of clinically relevant measurands that are not necessarily separated and detected by other laboratory techniques, such as immunoassays or microbiological assays. RM users may also need to propagate the measurement uncertainty of RM or other calibrator values to measurement results. NIST provides a publicly available online application ABACUS (Apps for Bayesian Analysis of Chemical quantities Using Shiny) intended as a tool for users to use all data from their experiments to calculate results with rigorous estimates of measurement uncertainty.
2019
Wednesday
1645
1800
Discussion : Clinical LC-MS/MS User Training is Lacking : Moving Towards Training and Certification
@ Stevenson 1

Judy Stone, MT (ASCP), PhD, DABCC
UCSF


Currently, there exist no formal training programs or licensure prerequisites for medical laboratory quantitative LC-MS/MS method development scientists or technologists. Although rudimentary LC-MS/MS theory may be part of Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS) or Medical Laboratory Technologist (MLT) programs, quantitative LC-MS/MS method development is highly complex and typically not included. Lab Directors who are authorized to approve LDT methods are not necessarily trained in the details of technical quantitative LC-MS/MS validation.

We see a need for training and certification. This round table aims to get input and discuss a way forward and discussion topics will include:

(1) Training options

  • Traveling Trainer
  • Laboratory Participant Training Sites
(2) Certification
  • how can we move forward?
  • What certification body is best?

This session is geared towards lab directors, lab scientists, and lab technologists. The goal is to get input from the community about what is needed and how the needs can be addressed.

2020
Wednesday
1800
2400
MSACL Hospitality Lounge
@ Club Room
2021

Thursday

Thursday
600
700
Morning Sunrise Activity
@ Ferrantes
2084
Thursday
700
800

Industry Workshop(s)

Thermo Fisher Scientific
@ Steinbeck 1

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Agilent Technologies
@ Steinbeck 2

Agilent Technologies Breakfast Workshop

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Restek
@ Steinbeck 3

Workshop summary coming soon ...

Thursday
800
845
Coffee Hour
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra

Visit the Exhibit Hall for a relaxed tour of the posters and Exhibits while enjoying your morning coffee.
2088
Thursday
800
845
Coffee Roundtables
@ Steinbeck Foyer
2022

Scientific Session 3

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Interoperative Dx

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Metabolomics

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Biomarkers

Track 4
Colton

TBA

845
905
Intra-operative Margin Assessment by REIMS During Breast Cancer Surgery and Validation Using a Spatio-Temporal Navigated Cautery and Histopathology
Martin Kaufmann
Queen’s University
A Quantitative Assay for Measuring 1000 Metabolites in Serum, Urine and Fecal Samples
David Wishart
University of Alberta
Development of a LC-MS/MS Method for Measurement of Fusion Sarcoma Proteins in Plasma
Anthony Maus
Mayo Clinic
TBA
905
925
Integrated Morphometric and Molecular Classification of Central Nervous System Cancers Using a Unified Platform with Picosecond Infrared Laser Mass Spectrometry
Alexa Fiorante
University of Toronto
TBA Hunting for Proteoforms in the Discovery and Verification of Novel Biomarkers of Frontotemporal Dementia
Lauren Forgrave
University of British Columbia
TBA
925
945
Molecularly Aware Robotics for Surgery (MARS) – Autonomous Surgical Intervention Using Mass Spectrometry Mapping
Mark Runciman
Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London
TBA Elevated Serum Butyrate, a Gut Microbial By-product, is Associated with Improved Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients
Liam Heaney
Loughborough University
TBA
Thursday
945
1000
Intermission
@ Steinbeck Foyer
2027

Scientific Session 4

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Ion Mobility

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Metabolomics 1

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Microbial Detection

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1000
1020
Targeted Quantification of Androgen Metabolites Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry
Christopher Chouinard
Clemson University
Identification of Metabolic Alterations Associated with Resistance to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Breast Cancer Utilizing Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Keziah Liebenberg
Baylor College of Medicine
Direct, Rapid and Accurate Identification of Sepsis Causative Micro-organisms from Positive Blood Cultures Using A Scout-triggered MRM Proteomics Assay
Maud Gregson
Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Université de Lyon, France
Practical Considerations for Sample Prep Selection: Where Sensitivity, Cost, and Turnaround Time Collide
Adina Badea
Lifespan Health/Rhode Island Hospital & the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
1020
1040
PFAS Dark Matter and Slippery Cannabis: Disparate Problems with a Similar Path to a Solution
Frederick Strathmann
MOBILion Systems
Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS for Plasma Metabolomic Profiling of Different Stages of SARS-CoV-2 Infected Individuals
Xian Luo
The Metabolomics Innovation Centre
Clinical Performance of the Osmotic Shock-MALDI MS Method to Detect Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase in Clinical Isolates
Je-Hyun Baek
Seegene Medical Foundation (R&D Center for Clinical Mass Spectrometry)
...
Extended Session
...
1040
1100
Leveraging Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for High-throughput Multi-omics
Kelly Hines
University of Georgia
Low Plasma Glutamine is Associated with Poor Outcomes in a Cohort of Acute Heart Failure Patients
Helen Jordan
University of Leicester
A Single and Rapid Zeno SWATH DIA Proteomic Analysis for Concomitant Identification and AMR Profiling of Micro-organisms from Positive Blood Cultures
Iulia Macavei
Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Université de Lyon, France
...
Extended Session
...
Thursday
1100
1230
Poster Session 3
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2032
Thursday
1130
1330
Lunch Buffett
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2034
Thursday
1230
1400
Poster Session 4
@ Exhibit Hall - Serra
2033
Thursday
1400
Exhibits Close
@ Steinbeck Foyer
2035

Scientific Session 5

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Antibody Analysis

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Metabolomics 2

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Single Cell Analysis

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1400
1420
Time to Fly; TOF Mass Spec for Quantitation of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies
Paula Ladwig
Mayo Clinic
High-Throughput Metabolomics in Screening, Triage, Diagnosis and Treatment of Cervical Disease
Maria Paraskevaidi
Imperial College London
Combined Single Neuron Patch-Clamp/Mass Spectrometry (PatchC-MS) Analyses
John Yates
Scripps Research Institute
Interpreting Urine Drug Testing Results
Melissa Budelier
TriCore Reference Laboratories
1420
1440
Lack of Unique Tryptic Peptides in Fully-Humanized Adalimumab Impedes Mass Spectrometry-based Quantification
Jocelyn V. Abonamah
Cleveland Clinic
Unique Chemoselective Probes for Discovery and Investigation of Metabolites in Human Samples with Enhanced Mass Spectrometric Sensitivity
Weifeng Lin
Uppsala University
TBA...
Extended Session
...
1440
1500
The Power of Mass Spectrometry in the Care of Patients with Monoclonal Gammopathies
Mindy Kohlhagen
Mayo Clinic
Using Multiple Serum Sample Cohorts with Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS to Discover Biomarkers for Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease
Xiaohang Wang
The Metabolomics Innovation Centre
TBA...
Extended Session
...

Scientific Session 6

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Microsample Analysis

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Are We Doing This Correctly?

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Data Science

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1515
1535
Evaluation and Application of Automated Non-contact Reflectance-based Hematocrit Prediction of Dried Blood Spots
Liesl Heughebaert
Ghent University
Free or Total Testosterone? Assessment of Androgen Status in Post-menopausal Females
Mark Kushnir
ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology
Comparative Analysis of Untargeted Metabolomics Data Processing Software on Large Scale LC-HRMS Datasets
Khyati Mehta
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital/University of Cincinnati
Practical Guidance and Examples of Estimating Reference Intervals by Indirect Methods for LDT Mass Spectrometry Assays
Elizabeth Frank, Kelly Doyle
University of Utah Health / ARUP Laboratories
1535
1555
Evaluation of Mass Spectrometry Methods for Glycosaminoglycan Biomarker Quantification in Mucopolysaccharidosis and GM1 Gangliosidosis Newborn Dried Blood Spots
Zackary Herbst
University of Washington
Feasibility of Routine Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for 5-Fluorouracil. Why Aren’t We Doing It?
Peter Galettis
University of Newcastle
TBA...
Extended Session
...
1555
1615
Assessment of a 60 Biomarker Health Surveillance Panel (HSP) on Whole Blood from Remote Sampling Devices by Targeted LC/MRM-MS and DIA-MS Discovery Analysis
Stephen A. Whelan
Cedars-Sinai Precision Biomarker Laboratories (PBL)
Assessment of Therapeutic Humanized IgG2 Antibody Concentrations in Human Plasma Using LC/PRM-MS and Elisa: A Comparative Study
Claudia Gaither
MRM Proteomics
Uncertainty Calculations for Reference Measurement Procedures
Andrea Geistanger
Roche Diagnostics GmbH
...
Extended Session
...

Scientific Session 7

Track 1
Steinbeck 1

Imaging / Cell Analysis

Track 2
Steinbeck 2

Microbiome

Track 3
Steinbeck 3

Emerging Tech

Track 4
Colton

Practical Training

1630
1650
Probing 3D Mammalian Co-culture Models of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis for Metabolic Crosstalk Using Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Hannah Lusk
University of California Santa Cruz
Towards Automated Point-of-Care Profiling of the Vaginal Microbiome Using Direct Swab Analysis by Desorption Electrospray Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS)
Eftychios Manoli
Imperial College London
Development of Thread Spray Mass Spectrometry for the Identification of Pulmonary Exacerbation Biomarkers in Cystic Fibrosis
Salmika Wairegi
The Ohio State University
Pediatric Toxicology Testing Strategies: A Case Based Discussion
Kara Lynch
University of California San Francisco
1650
1710
Multistage Imaging for the Investigation of Spatial Lipidomics Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease Using DESI-MSI and Fluorescence Microscopy
Riad Yagoubi
Imperial College London
Microbiota-Dependent Metabolomic Changes After Nutritional Intervention During Pregnancy
Emma Guiberson
Stanford University
Using Microprobe-Capture In-Emitter Elution and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for Characterization and Clinical Testing of β2-Transferrin
Ruben Y. Luo
Stanford University
...
Extended Session
...
1710
1730
Expanding the Tissue-based N-glycan Imaging MS Workflow into a Platform Technology for Glycan Targeted Biofluid and Cellular Diagnostics
Richard Drake
Medical University of South Carolina
Advanced Metabolomics Analysis Through Chemical Biology Tools for the Selective Investigation of Gut Microbiota-Derived Metabolites
Daniel Globisch
Uppsala University
Feasibility Analysis of iEndoscope for Real-Time Data Driven Pathology Using Novel MS and Optical Technology
Lauren Ford
Imperial College London
...
Extended Session
...
Thursday
1730
2030
Dinner & British-Style Trivia Night with Tim
@ San Carlos

with closing statements by the Steering Committee Chair.
2039
Thursday
2030
2400
MSACL Hospitality Lounge
@ Club Room
2040

Friday

Friday
600
700
Morning Sunrise Activity
@ Ferrantes
2085
Friday
645
930
MSACL Sunrise Challenge Walk-Jog to Lover's Point
@ Off-site

Meet on steps at Custom House Plaza in front of Monterey State Historic Park, just outside Portola (ocean-side). Just like last year.

5-mile round-trip. About 2 hours walking, 1 hour running. Or turn back at any point to shorten the distance.

Followed by breakfast burritos in the MSACL Lounge (Portola Club Room).

2043