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MSACL 2017 US: Preliminary Conference Program

Palm Springs, CA • January 22 - 26, 2017

With Thanks to Our Corporate Conference Sponsors:
Thermo
Shimadzu 
Indigo  Agilent 
Bruker Chromsystems SCIEX PerkinElmer

And Special Thanks to Our Travel Grant Sponsors:
Thermo Waters

Sunday

9:00 AM
8:00 PM
BADGE PICKUP
@ California Ballroom Foyer
10:30 AM
ECDC EVENT NOTICE
@ Top of San Jacinto Mountain via Palm Springs Aerial Tram

RESERVATION REQUIRED
Make Reservation during online Conference Registration. PLEASE READ BELOW

Priority given to Travel Grantees until Dec 2. Limited to 120 Registrants. General Registration opens for non-grantees, if space available, on Dec 2. $50 per registrant. Includes transport, lunch buffet and networking event with speakers.

How do I Modify My Conference Registration?
Answer: You should have received a confirmation email from RegOnline when you registered. Its subject will be MSACL Registration Confirmation. Within this email there is the option to Review your registration. Click on this and then Click on Manage your registration. Here you will need to enter the password that you created when you initiated your registration. Once in, you will be able to modify your registration.

10:30 AM
BUS PICKUP at HOTEL: Palm Springs Aerial Tram Retreat
@ Renaissance Hotel Front Entry

Sponsored by the Early Career Development Council (ECDC). Catch the bus to the Palm Springs Aerial Tram for a ride up the San Jacinto mountain.
RESERVATION REQUIRED
11:30 AM
1:00 PM
NETWORKING LUNCH BUFFET
@ The Francis Crocker Room at top of Palm Springs Aerial Tram

Enjoy a lunch buffet overlooking Palm Springs. For ECDC event guests only.
RESERVATION REQUIRED
11:45 PM
12:45 PM
ECDC SPEAKERS
@ The Francis Crocker Room at the top of the Palm Springs Aerial Tram

RESERVATION REQUIRED
Chair: David Herold

(1) Daniel Holmes, MD
The Importance of Providing an Interface between Labs Results and Clinicians

(2) Thomas Annesley, PhD
Why be a reviewer? What to look for, and how to write an effective review.

(3) Rainer Vollmerhaus, PhD
Effective Results Management

(4) Karen Mahooti, MBA
Creating Compelling Presentations

12:45 PM
1:30 PM
EXPLORE THE MOUNTAIN
@ Top of Palm Springs Aerial Tram

RESERVATION REQUIRED
1:30 PM
1st TRAM DEPARTURE FOR SHORT COURSES
@ Top of Palm Springs Aerial Tram

RESERVATION REQUIRED
1:45 PM
3:00 PM
ROTATING BUS PICKUP at TRAM BASE STATION
@ Tram Base Station

Return to Renaissance Hotel
RESERVATION REQUIRED
2:00 PM
LAST TRAM DEPARTURE FOR SHORT COURSES
@ Top of Palm Springs Aerial Tram

RESERVATION REQUIRED
3:00 PM
7:00 PM

SHORT COURSES

COURSE START
Data Science 101
Breaking up with Excel: A Newbie's Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
Daniel Holmes, MD & Stephen Master, MD, PhD (TA: Will Slade, PhD)
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 1 (Mojave)
COURSE START
LC-MSMS 101
Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MS/MS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
Lorin Bachmann, PhD & Grace van der Gugten
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 5 (Sierra)
COURSE START
LC-MSMS 201
Understanding and Optimization of LC-MS/MS to Develop Successful Methods for Identification and Quantitation in Complex Matrices
Robert D. Voyksner, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Andreas
COURSE START
LC-MSMS 202
Practical LC-MS Maintenance and Troubleshooting
J. Will Thompson, PhD, Erik J. Soderblom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6AB (Smoketree A-B)
COURSE START
LC-MSMS 301
Development and Validation of Quantitative LC-MS/MS Assays for Use in Clinical Diagnostics
Russell Grant, PhD & Brian Rappold
Level: 3 (Advanced)
Location: Rm 4 (Pasadena)
COURSE START
MALDI 102
Practical Considerations for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Michelle Reyzer, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 7B (Agua Caliente B)
COURSE START
Manuscripts 101
Preparing Manuscripts for Publication: Improving Your Chances for Success
Thomas Annesley, PhD
Level: 0 (General Interest)
Location: Rm 6E (Smoketree E)
COURSE START
Metabolomics 201
Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics in Clinical Analysis
Timothy Garrett, PhD & Erin Baker, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6C (Smoketree C)
COURSE START
Presentations 101
How to Maximize Your Influence Through Creating Compelling Presentations
Karen Mahooti, MBA
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6D (Smoketree D)
COURSE START
Proteomics 101
Introduction to Quantitative Proteomics
Mike MacCoss, PhD, Michael Bereman, PhD & Jarrett Egertson, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Chino
COURSE START
Proteomics 201
Clinical Proteomics
Andy Hoofnagle, MD, PhD, Cory Bystrom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 3 (Madera)
COURSE START
Sample Prep 201
Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
William Clarke, PhD & Mark Marzinke, PhD
Level: Beginner / Intermediate
Location: Pueblo
7:00 PM
8:30 PM

PRIVATE DISCUSSION GROUP
for Short Course Instructors
@ Chino

Short Course Instructors Feedback
Chino
Lead(s): Chris Herold
7:00 PM
8:00 PM
DINNER ON OWN
@ Your Decision.

Haven't decided on a dinner location yet? Head to the Hospitality Lounge at Rocks Patio to meet up with old friends or make new ones over drinks and light appetizers before heading to dinner in Palm Springs.
7:00 PM
10:00 PM
HOSPITALITY LOUNGE
@ Santa Rosa and Rocks Terrace (if weather is agreeable)

If we're lucky we'll get to enjoy the warm, dry Palm Springs atmosphere on the patio overlooking the pool, with fire pits. But it's probably going to be raining so probably best stay cozy in the Santa Rosa Lounge.

Monday

6:00 AM
7:00 AM
YOGA
@ San Jacinto

Energize yourself for the day! Yoga is a complimentary offering for all MSACL registrants.
A limited number of yoga mats will be provided.
6:00 AM
9:00 AM
BREAKFAST
@ Date Restaurant

MSACL Breakfast Voucher required for entry.
Short Course registrants receive meal vouchers during badge pick-up. Conference registrants can purchase a breakfast voucher at restaurant for $20.
7:00 AM
8:00 PM
BADGE PICKUP
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM
12:00 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group A
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :50, except before lunch and last hour of class.
Lunch 12:00 - 1:00 PM at Date Restaurant.

COURSE START
Clinical MS 301
A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Mass Spectrometry Technology & Techniques, including Miniaturization
Jack Henion, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 2 (Catalina)
Continued from Sunday
LC-MSMS 101
Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MS/MS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
Lorin Bachmann, PhD & Grace van der Gugten
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 5 (Sierra)
Continued from Sunday
LC-MSMS 301
Development and Validation of Quantitative LC-MS/MS Assays for Use in Clinical Diagnostics
Russell Grant, PhD & Brian Rappold
Level: 3 (Advanced)
Location: Rm 4 (Pasadena)
8:30 AM
12:30 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group B
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :20, except before lunch and last hour of class.
Lunch 12:30 - 1:30 PM at Date Restaurant.

Continued from Sunday
Manuscripts 101
Preparing Manuscripts for Publication: Improving Your Chances for Success
Thomas Annesley, PhD
Level: 0 (General Interest)
Location: Rm 6E (Smoketree E)
Continued from Sunday
Metabolomics 201
Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics in Clinical Analysis
Timothy Garrett, PhD & Erin Baker, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6C (Smoketree C)
Continued from Sunday
Presentations 101
How to Maximize Your Influence Through Creating Compelling Presentations
Karen Mahooti, MBA
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6D (Smoketree D)
Continued from Sunday
Proteomics 101
Introduction to Quantitative Proteomics
Mike MacCoss, PhD, Michael Bereman, PhD & Jarrett Egertson, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Chino
Continued from Sunday
Proteomics 201
Clinical Proteomics
Andy Hoofnagle, MD, PhD, Cory Bystrom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 3 (Madera)
9:00 AM
1:00 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group C
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :50, except before lunch and last hour of class.
Lunch 1:00 - 2:00 PM at Date Restaurant.

Continued from Sunday
Data Science 101
Breaking up with Excel: A Newbie's Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
Daniel Holmes, MD & Stephen Master, MD, PhD (TA: Will Slade, PhD)
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 1 (Mojave)
Continued from Sunday
LC-MSMS 201
Understanding and Optimization of LC-MS/MS to Develop Successful Methods for Identification and Quantitation in Complex Matrices
Robert D. Voyksner, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Andreas
Continued from Sunday
LC-MSMS 202
Practical LC-MS Maintenance and Troubleshooting
J. Will Thompson, PhD, Erik J. Soderblom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6AB (Smoketree A-B)
Continued from Sunday
MALDI 102
Practical Considerations for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Michelle Reyzer, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 7B (Agua Caliente B)
Continued from Sunday
Sample Prep 201
Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
William Clarke, PhD & Mark Marzinke, PhD
Level: Beginner / Intermediate
Location: Pueblo
Every 0:50
for 10 min
COFFEE BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Take a break and get a coffee, juice, water and/or small snack to refresh for the next session.
12:00 PM
2:00 PM
LUNCH
@ Date Restaurant & Patio

Short Course Registrants: You have 1 hr for lunch.
MSACL Lunch Voucher required for entry.
Short Course registrants receive lunch voucher during badge pick-up. Conference registrants can purchase a lunch voucher at the restaurant from an MSACL representative for $20.
1:00 PM
5:00 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group A
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :50, except last hour of class.

Continued from Monday AM
Clinical MS 301
A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Mass Spectrometry Technology & Techniques, including Miniaturization
Jack Henion, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 2 (Catalina)
Continued from Monday AM
LC-MSMS 101
Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MS/MS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
Lorin Bachmann, PhD & Grace van der Gugten
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 5 (Sierra)
Continued from Monday AM
LC-MSMS 301
Development and Validation of Quantitative LC-MS/MS Assays for Use in Clinical Diagnostics
Russell Grant, PhD & Brian Rappold
Level: 3 (Advanced)
Location: Rm 4 (Pasadena)
1:30 PM
5:30 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group B
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :20, except last hour of class.

COURSE START
Lab Medicine 101
Basics of Laboratory Medicine
Prof. Dr. med. Michael Vogeser
Level: 1 (Beginner)
Location: Rm 6E (Smoketree E)
Continued from Monday AM
Metabolomics 201
Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics in Clinical Analysis
Timothy Garrett, PhD & Erin Baker, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6C (Smoketree C)
COURSE START
Presentations 102
HANDS ON WORKSHOP: Create Your Own Compelling Presentation
Karen Mahooti, MBA
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6D (Smoketree D)
Continued from Monday AM
Proteomics 201
Clinical Proteomics
Andy Hoofnagle, MD, PhD, Cory Bystrom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 3 (Madera)
COURSE START
Results Management 101
Effective Results Management
Rainer Vollmerhaus, PhD
Level: 0 (General Interest)
Location: Chino
2:00 PM
6:00 PM

SHORT COURSES: Group C
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :50, except last hour of class.

Continued from Monday AM
Data Science 101
Breaking up with Excel: A Newbie's Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
Daniel Holmes, MD & Stephen Master, MD, PhD (TA: Will Slade, PhD)
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 1 (Mojave)
Continued from Monday AM
LC-MSMS 201
Understanding and Optimization of LC-MS/MS to Develop Successful Methods for Identification and Quantitation in Complex Matrices
Robert D. Voyksner, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Andreas
Continued from Monday AM
LC-MSMS 202
Practical LC-MS Maintenance and Troubleshooting
J. Will Thompson, PhD, Erik J. Soderblom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6AB (Smoketree A-B)
Continued from Monday AM
MALDI 102
Practical Considerations for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Michelle Reyzer, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 7B (Agua Caliente B)
Continued from Monday AM
Sample Prep 201
Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
William Clarke, PhD & Mark Marzinke, PhD
Level: Beginner / Intermediate
Location: Pueblo
5:00 PM
5:30 PM
Pre-Dinner Drinks
@ Rocks Terrace (COLD/RAIN: Santa Rosa)

** This event is open for all registrants. **
5:30 PM
7:00 PM
Reception & Dinner in Recognition of Travel Grantees
@ Rooms 2-5 and Registration Foyer

** This event is open for all registrants. **
7:00 PM
10:00 PM
HOSPITALITY
@ Santa Rosa and Rocks Terrace (if weather is agreeable)

If we're lucky we'll get to enjoy the warm, dry Palm Springs atmosphere on the patio overlooking the pool, with fire pits. But it's probably going to be raining so probably best stay cozy in the Santa Rosa Lounge. Drinks and light appetizers provided.

Tuesday

6:00 AM
7:00 AM
YOGA
@ San Jacinto

Energize yourself for the day! Yoga is a complimentary offering for all MSACL registrants.
A limited number of yoga mats will be provided.
6:00 AM
8:00 AM
BREAKFAST
@ Date Restaurant

MSACL Breakfast Voucher required for entry.
Short Course registrants receive meal voucher(s) during badge pick-up.
Conference registrants can purchase a voucher at the restaurant from an MSACL representative for $20.
7:00 AM
8:00 PM
BADGE PICKUP
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer
8:00 AM
12:00 PM

SHORT COURSES
10 minute Coffee Breaks at every :50, except last hour.

Continued from Monday PM
Clinical MS 301
A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Mass Spectrometry Technology & Techniques, including Miniaturization
Jack Henion, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 2 (Catalina)
Continued from Monday PM
Data Science 101
Breaking up with Excel: A Newbie's Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language
Daniel Holmes, MD & Stephen Master, MD, PhD (TA: Will Slade, PhD)
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 1 (Mojave)
Continued from Monday PM
Lab Medicine 101
Basics of Laboratory Medicine
Prof. Dr. med. Michael Vogeser
Level: 1 (Beginner)
Location: Rm 6E (Smoketree E)
Continued from Monday PM
LC-MSMS 101
Getting Started with Quantitative LC-MS/MS in the Diagnostic Laboratory
Lorin Bachmann, PhD & Grace van der Gugten
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 5 (Sierra)
Continued from Monday PM
LC-MSMS 201
Understanding and Optimization of LC-MS/MS to Develop Successful Methods for Identification and Quantitation in Complex Matrices
Robert D. Voyksner, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Andreas
Continued from Monday PM
LC-MSMS 202
Practical LC-MS Maintenance and Troubleshooting
J. Will Thompson, PhD, Erik J. Soderblom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6AB (Smoketree A-B)
Continued from Monday PM
LC-MSMS 301
Development and Validation of Quantitative LC-MS/MS Assays for Use in Clinical Diagnostics
Russell Grant, PhD & Brian Rappold
Level: 3 (Advanced)
Location: Rm 4 (Pasadena)
Continued from Monday PM
MALDI 102
Practical Considerations for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Michelle Reyzer, PhD
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 7B (Agua Caliente B)
Continued from Monday PM
Metabolomics 201
Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics in Clinical Analysis
Timothy Garrett, PhD & Erin Baker, PhD
Level: 2 (Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6C (Smoketree C)
Continued from Monday PM
Presentations 102
HANDS ON WORKSHOP: Create Your Own Compelling Presentation
Karen Mahooti, MBA
Level: 1-2 (Beginner - Intermediate)
Location: Rm 6D (Smoketree D)
Continued from Monday PM
Proteomics 201
Clinical Proteomics
Andy Hoofnagle, MD, PhD, Cory Bystrom, PhD & Chris Shuford, PhD
Level: 2-3 (Intermediate - Advanced)
Location: Rm 3 (Madera)
Continued from Monday PM
Results Management 101
Effective Results Management
Rainer Vollmerhaus, PhD
Level: 0 (General Interest)
Location: Chino
Continued from Monday PM
Sample Prep 201
Sample Preparation and Alternative Matrices for LC-MS Assays
William Clarke, PhD & Mark Marzinke, PhD
Level: Beginner / Intermediate
Location: Pueblo
Every 0:50
for 10 min
COFFEE BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Take a break and get a coffee, juice, water and/or small snack to refresh for the next session.
11:00 AM
4:00 PM
PLACE POSTERS
@ Exhibit Hall

All posters for entire conference to be placed during this period.
12:00 PM
2:00 PM
POOLSIDE OPENING LUNCH RECEPTION
@ Rocks Patio, Date Terrace, Poolside

Open to all registrants.
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 1
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
Metabolomics Keynote
Chair: Rick Yost
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Endocrine Keynote
Chair: Dan Holmes
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Proteomics Keynote
Chair: Jenny Van Eyk
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Small Molecule Keynote
Chair: Kara Lynch
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Tissue Imaging Keynote
Chair: Livia Eberlin
Track 6
SmokeTree

Chair: TBA
2:00 PM
2:45 PM
The Olympic Drug Testing System
Don Catlin
Anti-Doping Research Institute
New Frontiers for Hormone Testing by Mass Spectrometry
Stefan Grebe
Mayo Clinic
Translational Mass Spectrometry
Amanda Paulovich
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Advancing Whole-Plant Cannabis Clinical Interests
Jeffrey Raber
The Werc Shop
Mass Spectrometry for Image Guided Neurosurgery and Drug Development
Sankha (Bobby) Basu
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Replacing Nathalie Agar to give same or similar talk.
2:45 PM
3:00 PM
COFFEE BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 2
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
Metabolomics of Large Sample Cohorts
Chair: Rick Yost
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Endocrine Hypertension
Chair: Michael Chen
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Putting the Top Down and Taking Protemics for a Spin
Chair: Cory Bystrom
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Not-Your-Usual Drugs and Toxins
Chair: Mark Marzinke
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Intraoperative Diagnosis
Chair: Raf Van de Plas
Track 6
SmokeTree
Practical Training: Mass Spectrometry: An Overview
Chair: Alec Saitman
3:00 PM
3:20 PM
A Multi-Omic Analysis of Pre-Eclampsia and Related Conditions using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry
Christopher Chouinard
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Diagnosis of Adrenocortical Carcinoma by LC-HRAM Urine Steroid Profiling
Ann Rivard
The Mayo Clinic
Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Serum for Monoclonal Gammopathy Diagnosis by Use of 21 Tesla FT-ICR Top-Down and Middle-Down MS/MS
Lidong He
Florida State University
Anodyne by Design; Esoteric Designer Opiates in Pain Management
Gregory Janis
MedTox / Labcorp
Comparison of Radiative and Conductive Rapid Evaporation Ionisation Mass Spectrometry on Healthy and Cancerous Breast Tissue for Real-Time Tissue Identification
Zsolt Bodai
Imperial College London
The Basics of Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Why Many Call it the “Gold Standard”
Alec Saitman
Providence Regional Laboratories
3:20 PM
3:40 PM
Targeted Full-Scan LC-MS Metabolomic Workflow Enables Robust Quantitation of Known Compounds and Prospective Compound Discovery Across Large Sample Sets
Adam Rosebrock
Department of Pathology, Stony Brook School of Medicine
Some Like it Hot: Moving from Cold to Harmony in the Plasma Renin Activity Assay
William Slade
LabCorp
Detection of an Unreported Hemoglobin Variant by LC-MS/MS Intact Protein Characterization
Donald Hunt
University of Virginia
Opinion: An Appropriate Cutoff for Patients Tested for Alcohol Use using Urine Concentrations of Ethyl Sulfate
Amadeo Pesce
Precision Diagnostics

Replacing Shijun Lu to give different talk.
Solid Phase Microextraction – High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Integrated Platform for Multilevel Clinical Analysis
Barbara Bojko
Nicolaus Copernicus University
Clinical Mass Spectrometry: A Gold Standard in Routine Applications
Alicia Hutcherson Wright
Providence Health & Services
3:40 PM
4:00 PM
Development of a High-Throughput Information Rich LC-MS Platform for Large Cohort Epidemiology & Biomedical Research Studies
Robert Plumb
Imperial College London
The Role of LC-MS/MS in the Diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome Presenting as Factitious Hypercortisolism
Joshua Buse
University of Calgary
Translational Top-Down Proteomics as a Path Forward to Improved Diagnostics in Liver Transplant Rejection
Timothy Toby
Northwestern University
Quantification of Soapberry Toxins and their Urinary Metabolites by HPLC-MS/MS
Samantha Isenberg
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Touch Spray-Mass Spectrometry with Medical Swabs for in Vivo Analysis of Surgical Margins during Brain Tumor Resection
Valentina Pirro
Purdue University
Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Clinical Mass Spectrometry Case Studies
Matthew Feldhammer
Emory University
4:00 PM
EXHIBITS OPEN
@ Exhibit Hall
4:00 PM
5:00 PM
HAPPY HOUR POSTER SESSION
@ Exhibit Hall

With Pretzels & Popcorn
Plenary Lecture Series
@ Exhibit Hall (Oasis)
Chair: Donald Hunt
5:00 PM
6:00 PM
Translational Top Down Proteomics in Oncology: from Histones to KRAS and Beyond
Neil Kelleher
Northwestern University

Switching presentation positions with C. Fenselau who is now presenting Wednesday at 9AM. Travel delay.

A general theme in translational proteomics that involves first genotyping patients will be presented. Some peptide-driven assays for histone modifications in cancer epigenetics will be presented, along with whole-protein (i.e., top down proteomic) measurements of high value targets like KRAS. Assays deployed in clinical research are typically developed and validated with basic studies ofisogenic cell-based models of colorectal cancer, multiple myeloma, and glioblastoma. Current state-of-the-art in whole protein mass spectrometry will be presented, along with the state of play in assessing the value of proteoform-resolved measurements in clinical research and biomarker discovery & verification.
6:00 PM
6:15 PM
WELCOME & ORIENTATION
@ Exhibit Hall
6:30 PM
7:30 PM
TROUBLESHOOTING GRAND ROUNDS
@ Exhibit Hall

With Foosball Tourney, Heavy Appetizers and Drinks
7:30 PM
8:30 PM

CMS JOURNAL DISCUSSION GROUP
@ Room 1 (Mojave)

CMS Journal Discussion Group
Rm 1: Mojave
Lead(s): Chris Herold
7:30 PM
10:00 PM
HOSPITALITY
@ Santa Rosa and Rocks Terrace (if weather is agreeable)

They say it should be getting a little warmer and less wet today. Hopefully we'll get some time on the Terrace. Light Appetizers and Drinks served.

Wednesday

6:00 AM
7:00 AM
YOGA
@ San Jacinto

Energize yourself for the day! Yoga is a complimentary offering for all MSACL registrants.
A limited number of yoga mats will be provided.
6:45 AM
8:00 AM
BREAKFAST
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Enjoy a light continental breakfast before exploring a corporate workshop.
7:00 AM
7:45 AM

CORPORATE WORKSHOPS (Early AM)

MSACL
Rm 1: Mojave

Ensuring the future of innovation in laboratory medicine
Chair: Stephen Master
Panel: Drs. Michael Bennett (President, AACC), Richard Friedberg (President, CAP), Steve Gonias (Chair of Pathology, UCSD)

The development of clinical laboratory medicine over the past century has been driven by advancements in the range of analytes measured and the analytical performance provided by novel technologies. The discipline has continued to create and implement new diagnostic modalities, with mass spectrometry being the most recent example of a technology that provides fundamental improvements in clinical testing capabilities. This historical success in clinical translation has depended on an adequately trained group of clinical laboratorians (both MD and PhD-level leadership as well as technologists) with the resources to perform assay development and optimization. However, the need for trained personnel has also spurred commercial development of turnkey (or even Point-of-Care) versions of these technologies. Paradoxically, this may reduce the willingness of medical centers to support trained personnel and the development infrastructure that is required for the further advancement of diagnostics through advanced mass spectrometry, informatics, and other emerging technologies.

In light of this issue, it will be important for professional societies and organizations dedicated to clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine to develop effective and cooperative strategies to ensure the ongoing intellectual vitality of the field. Specifically, a number of questions will need to be addressed: How do we provide adequate training in novel assay development for laboratorians? How do we identify and strategically support emerging technologies? What are the roles of academic medical centers, large reference labs, and IVD companies in technology development pipelines? How do we effectively advocate for funding sources that can encourage translational diagnostic development? How do we ensure that test development addresses significant medical needs? How do we communicate this value to health care payers? If technology development is centralized at a small number of centers, is this adequate for robust and creative development of technology?

Spark Holland
Rm 2: Catalina

1. A Dried Plasma Spot Device for the Collection and Automated On-Line LC/MS/MS Bioanalysis of Micro Blood Samples, 2. The Hematocrit Issue in Dried Blood Spot Analysis: Still an Issue?
1. Jack Henion, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor, Cornell University,
2. Christophe Stove, Ph.D. Professor, Ghent University

Major Dried Blood Spot (DBS) uses include screening for inborn metabolomic errors, epidemiological surveys (e.g. HIV monitoring), TDM, and toxicology. Implementing dried blood microsamples in an analytical workflow offers advantages, including simplification of sample collection, transport, storage and processing, as well as automation. Furthermore, it enables collection by non-medically trained persons in remote areas or at home. However, DBS also introduces challenges, such as a need for sensitivity and extensive method validation. Quantitative DBS analysis suffers from issues that continue to limit its breakthrough into routine bioanalysis. Amongst these are spot volume, spot inhomogeneity, and influence of hematocrit. The latter has proven especially problematic for widespread DBS acceptance. Recently, several approaches to accommodate the hematocrit issue have been developed, the pros and cons of which will be discussed in these presentations.

Biotage
Rm 3: Madera

Practical Considerations for LC/MS Method Development of a Comprehensive Urine Pain Panel
Stephanie J. Marin, Ph.D.

Pre-Register

There has been increased interest in the clinical laboratory to develop comprehensive LC-MS/MS assays for urine drug testing, with 50 or more drugs and metabolites from multiple drug classes in a single method. These panels can increase throughout and improve laboratory efficiency, but create many challenges. Considerations for developing robust sample preparation methods for acidic, basic and neutral drugs for pain management and compliance testing in hydrolyzed urine specimens will be discussed. Method development strategies depending upon the compounds of interest will be presented.

8:00 AM
8:45 AM

CORPORATE WORKSHOPS (AM)

Bruker
Rm 1: Mojave

(1) Rapid Response: Precision Microbiome Detection, (2) Implementing the MicroFlex in the Clinical Laboratory to Identify Monoclonal Proteins in Serum
(1) Alexander A. Aksenov, PhD, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UCSD, (2) David Barnidge, PhD, Mayo Clinic

(1) The goal of the Rapid Response Precision Microbiome (RRPM) initiative at UCSD is to enable under 48-hour integrated "-omics" reporting to the physician. We will highlight what it takes to achieve such rapid turn-around on microbial molecules, host status, antibiotic resistance and/or drug metabolism, but also demonstrate points for optimization. (2) Introduction of a mass spectrometer into a clinical lab unfamiliar with the platform can be challenging. Here we discuss implementation of the Bruker MicroFlex MALDI-TOF into a protein immunology lab where the results obtained by mass spectrometry are compared to gel electrophoresis for specific clinical tests. The talk will present results observed using the MicroFlex in combination with automated liquid sample handling and matrix spotting for samples taken from a serum tube.

Thermo Scientific
Rm 2: Catalina

Can you reduce drug testing reimbursement challenges? A case study using HRMS for simultaneous analyte screening and quantitation.
Ana Grenier, Ph.D.

Continuing to manage healthcare cost constraints and monitoring therapy adherence and abstinence from non-prescribed drugs are important aspects to consider when physicians prescribe drugs with the potential of misuse, abuse, and addiction. Typically, drug monitoring is performed by screening urine using an immunoassay technique, and confirmed by mass spectrometry methodologies (GC/MS or LC MS/MS). Innovations in mass spectrometry technologies, such as resolution power, have made possible to improve the accuracy of testing in the clinical research market. Here, we present the clinical research evaluation for the simultaneous screening for analytes of interest and to quantify 47 drugs in urine by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry utilizing the Q Exactive™ instrument.

Waters
Rm 3: Madera

Low-flow Immunoaffinity Mass Spectrometry for the Masses and Implications for Biomedical Research
Michael Lassman, Principle Scientist, Merck

Only 4-5 years ago, neither low-flow mass spectrometry, nor immunoaffinity mass spectrometry (IA-LC/MS) could be considered routine platforms. These techniques, championed by specialized laboratories were only applied within a small number of academic research groups. High sensitivity platforms such as nanoflow mass spectrometry which measured proteins and peptides in in vitro cell lines, could not be easily incorporated into translational or clinical research. Leap forward half a decade, and IA-LC/MS is not simple, but is applied in many academic, research, government and hospital laboratories, allowing specific and robust quantitation of proteins and peptides in complex matrices that could only be measured previously using immunoassays. The value of IA-LC/MS in biomedical research will be explored as will implications on how IA-LC/MS may enable improved clinical research and patient care.

Indigo BioAutomation
Rm 4: Pasadena

The Batch and Beyond - LCMS Result Automation Strategies and Analytics
Jim Edwards

The utilization of self-aware peak processing algorithms, a comprehensive quality architecture, and a streamlined, exception-based data/result review process have proven to be a successful strategy for improving both quality and throughput of LCMS analysis. The positive impacts of these batch-oriented optimizations can be significantly magnified by an additional layer of analytics and visualization which provide comprehensive information across instruments, assays, and batches over time. Please join us for a discussion on how these analytics are used to diagnose and prevent issues, target quality improvement efforts where they will be most effective, improve the quality and speed of automated result release, and align both the business and science aspects of the laboratory for an elevation in the efficiency and effectiveness of both.

SCIEX
Rm 5: Sierra

The Evolution of SelexION® ION Mobility Technology: Past, Present and Future
Michael Jarvis

Pre-Register

Since its introduction in 2011, a growing list of LC-MS/MS applications in Clinical Research, Lipidomics, and Forensics have benefited from the use of SelexION(R) ion mobility technology. In this workshop we will present an overview of the technology, a history of the evolution of the product, and key examples of applications that have benefited from the use of this unique technology. We will also offer an exciting glimpse into the future, with a sneak peek at enhanced capabilities currently under development. Please join us for this exciting presentation!

8:00 AM
9:00 AM
WELCOME COFFEE
@ Exhibit Hall

Coffee & Tea served.
Distinguished Contribution Award & Plenary Lecture
@ Exhibit Hall (Oasis)
Chair: Andy Hoofnagle & Russell Grant
9:00 AM
9:45 AM
Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry: What can be Learned and How?
Catherine Fenselau
University of Maryland

Distinguished Contribution Award Lecture

Various configurations of MALDI mass spectrometry have been developed for rapid detection of unprocessed microorganisms on the battle field. Recently this direct approach has been approved by the FDA for use in clinical microbiology. Automated data processing has a critical role in both of these applications, and both library matching and proteomic bioinformatics have been developed to identify bacteria based on their mass spectra. This presentation will include a historical overview of the biomarkers, including phospholipids and proteins, which can be observed directly from unprocessed bacteria and yeast using many different ionization methods. Observations will be offered on strategies for sample enrichment. Current limitations and challenges for mass spectrometry-based strategies will be discussed.
9:45 AM
10:45 AM
POSTERS
@ Exhibit Hall

Coffee, tea, doughnuts, mandarins and bananas served.
Plenary Lecture Series
@ Exhibit Hall (Oasis)
Chair: Kristina Schwamborn
10:45 AM
11:30 AM
Molecular Tissue-Typing: Comprehensive Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Translational Clinical Research
Ron M.A. Heeren
M4I, Maastricht University
A comprehensive understanding of molecular patterns of health and disease is needed to pave the way for personalized medicine and tissue regeneration. The best way to capture disease complexity is to chart and connect multilevel molecular information within a tissue using mass spectrometry and data algorithms. this molecular tissue-typing using imaging mass spectrometry provides unique insights in patterns of health and disease. Mass spectrometry based molecular information is impacting clinical research and diagnosis in various disciplines, ranging from pathology to surgical care. Molecular detail provided by translational imaging mass spectrometry is demonstrated to directly benefit patient cure and care.
11:30 PM
1:00 PM
LUNCH
@ Exhibit Hall

Boxed lunch. Seating provided in Exhibit Hall AND the East Lawn outside Exhibit Hall. • Get ready to join a Corporate Workshop at 1:00 PM.
1:00 PM
1:30 PM

CORPORATE WORKSHOPS (PM)

Thomson Instrument Co
Rm 1: Mojave

Detection of THC in oral fluid: the bane of a toxicologist’s existence.
Jill Yeakel, Lehigh Valley Toxicology

Pre-Register

This presentation will review the comparison of two sample preparation techniques used for the analysis of THC in oral fluid samples. Due to the chemical composition of THC, many scientists struggle to achieve both clean extractions and sensitive detection. The difference between solid phase extraction and filter vial preparations will be discussed to determine the optimal procedure prior to injection on a liquid chromatograph tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS). The instrumental parameters for analysis on the LC-MS/MS will also be provided to illustrate the most advantageous process for sensitively detecting THC along with a multitude of other drugs in a single method.

Thermo Scientific
Rm 2: Catalina

Paperspray MS in clinical research: early experiences in a U.K.  clinical laboratory
Lewis Couchman, Viapath Analytics, Kings College Hospital, London, UK

Paperspray MS offers a unique opportunity for clinical laboratories in which dried samples collected onto filter papers are analysed directly, and rapidly, without any prior sample extraction or preparation.In this workshop, our early experiences using Paperspray MS in conjunction with high-resolution, accurate mass detection (Q Exactive MS) will be discussed.  Considerations for the development of targeted quantitative applications from dried blood samples will be covered, including possible approaches to calibrate and add internal standards to account for paperspray and 'extraction' variability.  Secondly, the use of Paperspray MS as an analytical screening tool for drugs of abuse in dried urine samples will be discussed. Approaches for MS data acquisition to maximize the possibility of compound identification will be covered.

Phenomenex
Rm 3: Madera

Demystifying a Couple of Challenging Assays
Seyed Sadjadi

In this workshop we discuss the use of stationary and mobile phase modifications to overcome chromatographic challenges in two quantitative assays: EtS/EtG and Chiral Amphetamines. First, we discuss the use of new LC stationary phases and mobile phases to solve the issues of polarity, isobaric urine interference, and retention in Ethyl Glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl Sulfate (EtS). Next we will discuss the role of mobile phase pH in the chiral separation of methamphetamine and related compounds. The result of this investigation will be better understanding of how minor adjustments can make major improvements in assay performance.

Shimadzu
Rm 4: Pasadena

Integration & Implementation of Fully Automated Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry
Isabel Cabruja (CEO, Shimadzu Italy) and Manoj Tyagi, PhD. FACB, NRCC -CC (Medical Lab Director, Captiva LLC)

The direct detection of disease related biological compounds and drugs in blood, urine, or other biological samples are possible thanks to mass spectrometry. The bottleneck, however, remains sample preparation, which is often tedious, increases contamination and introduces errors. This interactive workshop will take a closer look at the implementation of full sample preparation automation for triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The Shimadzu CLAM-2000 is the first system in the world able to perform all steps fully automated from pretreatment of the sample to LCMS analysis We will demonstrate successful integration of sample prep automation for several assays, and Dr. Manoj Tyagi (Captiva Labs) will join us to present a fully automated approach to quantitative clinical toxicology and drug analysis from oral fluid matrix.

SCIEX
Rm 5: Sierra

Microflow LC: Improving sensitivity for the quantitation of biopharmaceuticals with LC-MS
Remco Van Soest

Pre-Register

The utilization of Microflow LC is increasing in LC-MS due to the potential to increase sensitivity in comparison to traditional flow LC-MS. This workshop will focus on the successful application of MicroLC in the quantitation of peptide and protein drugs in plasma.

1:30 PM
1:45 PM
COFFEE BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Take a break! :) with coffee, tea and brownies.
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 3
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
New Bugs and New Methods: MS and Clinical Microbiology
Chair: Jennifer Dien Bard
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Data Automation
Chair: Shannon Haymond
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Immunoglobulins: Therapy and Diagnosis
Chair: Steve Master
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
New Developments in Clinical Tox
Chair: Jenn Colby
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Histology Directed Imaging
Chair: Barbara Bojko
Track 6
SmokeTree
Practical Training in Protein Quantification
Chair: Clark Henderson
1:45 PM
2:05 PM
Rapid Evaporative Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (REIMS): A Platform for Microbial Identification, Functional Classification, and Direct from Sample Analysis
Simon Cameron
Imperial College London
Design of Experiments for Optimization of LC-MS/MS Clinical Diagnostic Assays
Margrét Thorsteinsdóttir
Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland
Using Mass Spectrometry to Monitor IgG Heavy Chains: A Continuation of MS-based Immunoglobulin Analysis in the Clinical Laboratory
David Barnidge
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Data Dependent or Data Independent Acquisition: Evaluation of SWATH for Drug Screening
Kara Lynch
University of California San Francisco
Eicosanoid Detection in Cancer using DESI-imaging
Renata Soares
Imperial College London
Evaluation of Quantitative Proteomic Methods
Clark Henderson
University of Washington Medical Center
2:05 PM
2:25 PM
Diagnostic Identification of Clinical Yeasts and Molds by Metal Oxide Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometric Fatty Acid Profiling
Christopher Cox
Colorado School of Mines
Eliminating Review of Acceptable Mass Spectrometry Data – an Approach using Machine Learning Algorithm
Min Yu
University of Virginia
Quantification of Disease Burden and Therapeutic Antibody Levels in Multiple Myeloma Patients
Melissa Hoffman
Moffitt Cancer Center/University of South Florida
‘Chromatogra-Free’: Ultra-Rapid LC-MS/MS Analysis Demonstrated using Clozapine and Norclozapine
Lewis Couchman
Viapath, King's College Hospital
Novel Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) Biomarkers of Breast Tumor Aggressiveness
Kristine Glunde
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Selection of Optimal Peptides for Targeted Proteomic Experiments
James Bollinger
Washington University School of Medicine
2:25 PM
2:45 PM
Identification of Mycobacterium to Species Level using MALDI-TOF MS and ASTA MycoDB
Hyung Soon Park
ASTA Inc.
Take Back Your Techs’ Time by Letting Your Data Flow
Shannon Haymond
Northwestern University
Quantitation of Intact Light Chains by the Q-Exactive Produces a Sensitive and Rapid Assay for Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies
Kendall Cradic
Mayo Clinic
Use of Automation to Achieve High Performance Solid Phase Extraction
Mark Hayward
ITSP solutions
View Slides (PDF)
Molecular Markers of Serous Ovarian Cancer Aggressiveness and Surgical Outcome by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging
Marta Sans
The University of Texas
How NOT to Calibrate Your Protein Assay
Christopher Shuford
Laboratory Corporation of America
2:45 PM
3:00 PM
TEA-TIME BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Enjoy some tea with tiny sandwiches! :)
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 4
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
Clinical Insights from Metabolomics
Chair: Tim Garrett
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Assay Standardization I
Chair: Julianne Cook Botelho
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Cardiovascular Biomarkers: Chronic to Critical
Chair: Michael Lassman
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Dried Blood Spots
Chair: Brian Rappold
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Multimodal Imaging: Technology Driven
Chair: Kristine Glunde
Track 6
SmokeTree
Practical Training in LC-MSMS Troubleshooting
Chair: Imir Metushi
3:00 PM
3:20 PM
A New Pathway for Glutaminolysis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Robert Jansen
Weill Cornell Medicine
Native Matrix/Surrogate Analyte Calibration: Quantifying Testosterone with Deuterated Testosterone Calibrators
Joshua Hayden
Weill Cornell Medical College
ADAM(TS13) and Eve: Clinical Proteomics Taking Yet Another Bite of the Apple with the Irresistible LC-MS/MS Technique
Christopher Shuford
Laboratory Corporation of America
Development and Application of Novel, Nondestructive Dried Blood Spot-based Hematocrit Prediction Methods using Noncontact Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy
Christophe Stove
Ghent University
Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with in Vivo Luminescent Imaging Reveals the Molecular Panels of Different Treatment Responses in Lymphoma Models
Florian Barré
Maastricht University, M4I
LC-MS/MS Troubleshooting: An Introduction
Imir Metushi
LabCorp/Esoterix
3:20 PM
3:40 PM
Systems Biology Guided by Metabolomics Helps Define Sargramostim Immunotherapy of Parkinson’s Disease
Erica Forsberg
The Scripps Research Institute
Universal Calibration: Populations Don’t Lie, People Do
Matthew Crawford
LabCorp
Targeted Proteomic Estimation of High Density Lipoprotein Function is Associated with Cardiovascular Disease
Cory Bystrom
Cleveland HeartLab, Inc.
Do DBS and DPS Micro Sampling Techniques have a Place in the Clinical Laboratory?
Jack Henion
Q2 Solutions
Advances in Data-Driven Image Fusion for Imaging MS: Novel Image Modality Combinations Targeting Distinct Biomolecular Classes
Raf Van de Plas
Delft University of Technology
Investigation of Peak Shape Degradation and Retention Time Shifts
Breland Smith
University of California San Diego
3:40 PM
4:00 PM
Metabolic Profiling Reveals a Potential Novel Pathway of Macrophage Foam Cell Apoptosis in Atherogenesis
Panagiotis Vorkas
Imperial College London
Authentic or Analogue Calibration: Is there a Difference for Protein Quantification?
Russell Grant
LabCorp
A Critical Evaluation of a Clinically Utilized Immunoassay for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk
Celalettin Topbas
Cleveland Heart Lab
Validation of Creatinine in Dried Blood Spots: Remote Monitoring in Pediatric Renal Transplant Patients
Jane Dickerson
Seattle Children's Hospital
Multimodal Imaging of Ad-Associated Lipid Species in Structurally Distinct Plaques
Wojciech Michno
Sahlgrenka Academy at University of Gothenburg
Naturally Occurring Isotopes Affecting the Calibration Curve: A Case Study
Philip Sobolesky
UCSD
4:00 PM
5:00 PM
TROUBLESHOOTING GRAND ROUNDS
@ Exhibit Hall

With Foosball Tourney, Pretzels, Popcorn and drinks served.
5:00 PM
6:00 PM
HAPPY HOUR POSTER SESSION
@ Exhibit Hall

Pretzels, Popcorn and drinks served.
6:00 PM
7:00 PM

DISCUSSION GROUPS
@ Rooms around Ballroom Foyer

CDC Standardization Programs Forum
Andreas
Lead(s): Julianne Botelho & Hubert Vesper

Participants will discuss how CDC Standardization Programs support laboratories with improving measurements for key hormones such as 25-hydroxyvitamin D, estradiol, and testosterone. Included will be additional discussions about new projects and tools available in CDC Standardization Programs.

Exhibitor Feedback
Mesquite H
Lead(s): Amber Herold

Exhibitors, let MSACL know your thoughts on the way the conference is working for you and what we can do to make the experience better in the long run.

Practical Training Track Development
Chino
Lead(s): Robert Fitzgerald

Feedback on the Practical Training track. How is it going? What can be improved?

Being a Reviewer
Pueblo
Lead(s): Thomas Annesley

1) Why be a reviewer? and 2) what to look for and how to write up an effective review.

Solutions in Search of a Problem? Making Assays Matter for Patients
Rm 1: Mojave
Lead(s): Stephen Master

Panel Discussion with: a practicing physican (Alyssa Burgart, Pediatric Anaesthesiology, Stanford), an MD clinical chemist (Dan Holmes, University of British Columbia), and a pediatric metabolism specialist (Mike Bennett, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia).

Even the most advanced MS-based assay will fail if it cannot be translated into a clinical decision. A successful diagnostic should answer an important clinical question, provide adequate performance to support a clinical management decision, be delivered within a clinically relevant time-frame, and be understood by the clinician. Complex biomarker discovery efforts based on sensitive emerging technologies and improved biological understanding must still meet these basic criteria if we want our work to matter for patients. One key is ensuring that the clinical laboratory is adequately integrated with clinicians on a regular basis to understand the true clinical needs and ensure that the strengths and weaknesses of assays are clearly understood.

We will discuss the nature of clinical decision-making, important gaps in current testing capabilities, and paradigms for effective collaboration between the lab and the clinician. Our questions will include: What tests do physicians need, and why? How do assay performance and turnaround time influence the utility of a clinical test? What programs have been successful in ensuring that the lab develops tests that meet clinical need? How can the lab effectively communicate the interpretation of complex, emerging tests? What are the ethical considerations for determining when a test is “useful enough” to justify the cost of its development?

Translating Protein MS Assays into the Clinical Laboratory
SmokeTree
Lead(s): Dobrin Nedelkov

Protein MS assays are assured to be the next-generation tests for precise and enabling measurement of clinical protein biomarkers. Or are they? In the 30 years after the MALDI and ESI invention, only a dozen or so protein MS tests have been translated into clinical laboratories. Analytical performance requirements have been in place for some time, along with small molecules MS clinical tests precedents, so why haven’t more protein MS assays found their ways into clinical labs? Is there anything else missing? What about the clinical and economic drivers? If some of these key drivers have not been met yet, are we to proceed with the protein MS tests translation anyway, anticipating near-term clinical adoption? How do we then pick the biomarker targets for these tests? Many players have a stake in the clinical protein MS tests– from reagents and instruments manufacturers, to clinical labs and diagnostic companies. So please join us for a lively discussion and confessions of the culpable that may help us answer the ultimate question: Are clinical protein MS tests prophetic or just rhetoric?

7:00 PM
8:00 PM
MEXICAN FIESTA DINNER
@ Rms 2-5 & Registration Foyer

Enjoy a taste of southern California and get ready for the Occasionals and maybe something more.
8:00 PM
?
THE OCCASIONALS
@ Rms 2-5 (California Ballroom)

The Occasionals ... a band of rag-tag musical marauders. The first organic band to originate from the MSACL attendee base.
8:00 PM
10:00 PM
HOSPITALITY
@ Santa Rosa and Rocks Terrace (if weather is agreeable)

They say it should be getting a little warmer and less wet today. Hopefully we'll get some time on the Terrace. Light Appetizers and Drinks served.

Thursday

6:00 AM
7:00 AM
YOGA
@ San Jacinto

Energize yourself for the day! Yoga is a complimentary offering for all MSACL registrants.
A limited number of yoga mats will be provided.
6:45 AM
8:00 AM
BREAKFAST
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Enjoy a light continental breakfast before exploring a corporate workshop.
8:00 AM
8:45 AM

CORPORATE WORKSHOPS (AM)

Hamilton Robotics
Rm 1: Mojave

Automated Extraction of Catecholamines and Metabolites in Urine and Novel Methods for the Isolation of Steroids in Serum using Hamilton MICROLAB® NIMBUS96 and LC-MS/MS
Kaylee Mastrianni, PhD., Applications Chemist, DPX Technologies, LLC, Columbia, SC; Daniel B. Kassel, PhD., Founder & CEO, SciAnalytical Strategies, Inc., La Jolla, CA

Pre-Register

A simple diphenylboronic acid (DPBA) complexation prior to dispersive pipette extraction (DPX) minimizes oxidation and maximizes selectivity and recovery of bioamines from urine. Automation of the DPX extraction using the Hamilton NIMBUS96 facilitates higher throughput of 96 samples making this method ideal for clinical laboratories experiencing increased demand for epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, metanephrine and normetanephrine testing in urine. Analyses of steroids includes a patent pending protein crash method based on DPX extraction that streamlines the entire process from serum extraction to LC-MS/MS analysis without the need for centrifugation and vortex mixing. Up to 96 serum samples are processed simultaneously in ~10 minutes on an automated liquid handler, providing clean extracts, immediately ready for analysis.

Thermo Scientific
Rm 2: Catalina

Speeding up the cancer biomarker discovery: Advanced Clinical Proteomics workflow with High Resolution MS
Sebastien Gallien, Ph.D., Former researcher at CRP-Santé LIH Luxembourg Institute of Health

Adoption of cancer biomarkers in clinical labs has been plagued by the speed with which these biomarkers are discovered and validated for clinical use. Clinical proteomics approaches where the use of predefined set of surrogate peptides for proteins has been helpful in systematically identifying these markers. Targeted analyses using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), performed on high resolution and accurate-mass (HRAM) quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometers, present the selectivity and sensitivity to confidently quantify peptides in complex samples. The internal standards (IS) used for isotope dilution quantification were recently leveraged to actually drive the acquisition (“internal standard triggered-parallel reaction monitoring”, IS-PRM), thus improving the acquisition efficiency. Leatn how to uncover biomarkers faster.

Restek
Rm 3: Madera

Ultra-rapid LC-MS/MS analysis
Lewis Couchman, Toxicology Unit, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Viapath Analytics, King’s College Hospital, London, UK.

Typically, targeted quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses using gradient elution are carried out at the rate of a few minutes per injection. In this workshop, an approach to ultra-rapid LC-MS/MS analysis using Raptor biphenyl columns will be demonstrated in which complete injection-to-injection cycle-times are approximately 30 seconds without the requirement for LC multi-plexing. Despite such short analysis times, chromatographic efficiency is typically maintained (e.g. for drugs and metabolites), and the approach has been shown to be applicable to a range of compounds. Retention time reproducibility of more than 1,500 injections on a single short column has been shown to be excellent. Practical considerations and requirements for this approach will be demonstrated using a range of analytes for which therapeutic drug monitoring is advocated.

Shimadzu
Rm 4: Pasadena

Advances in Human Microbiome Science: Metabolic Disease
Stanley L Hazen, MD, PhD (Chair of the Department of Cellular & Molecular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, Section Head of Preventive Cardiology & Rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic, Jan Bleeksma Chair in Vascular Cell Biology and Atherosclerosis, and the Leonard Krieger Chair in Preventive Cardiology)

Dr. Hazen’s laboratory focuses on understanding mechanisms through which inflammation contributes to diseases such as atherosclerosis. His work has led to numerous discoveries in multiple areas of cardiovascular disease research. His discovery of a mechanistic link between gut microbes and cardiovascular disease was awarded as an Inaugural recipient of a “Top 10 Clinical Discovery of the Year (2011)” award by the Clinical Research Forum (April, 2012), which is comprised of leadership at NHLBI, academia and industry. His further studies on the gut microbe – cardiovascular disease connection were recognized by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association in 2014 as a “2013 top 10 advances in heart disease and stroke science”. Dr. Hazen will present on mass spectrometry based applications to human microbiome analysis.

MilliporeSigma
Rm 5: Sierra

Facilitating LC/MS Method Development: Impact of Stationary Phase Chemistry
David S. Bell, PhD

Problems encountered executing LC/MS methods are often a result of the choice of column chemistry employed. Many analysts will reach for their C18 upon commencement of method development; however C18s are often not the best tool for a given separation. There are many choices of alternative stationary phase chemistries that render the phase decision difficult. In this work stationary phase classes and chromatographic modes which are highly complementary to alkyl phases are discussed. An understanding of the contrasting interactions that these classes of stationary phase chemistries provides guidance regarding the choice of phase that may be most appropriate for a given task. This critical information promises to facilitate LC/MS method development and generate simpler, more reliable separations

8:00 AM
9:00 AM
WELCOME COFFEE
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Coffee served.
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 5
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
Platforms to Screen Small Molecules in the Clinic
Chair: Chris Chouinard
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
BNP
Chair: Josh Buse
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Clinical Proteomics: Methods and Samples
Chair: Mari DeMarco
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Endogenous Molecules
Chair: Sean Agger
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Solving Clinical Problems
Chair: Ron Heeren
Track 6
SmokeTree
Practical Training in Real-World Matrix Effect Studies
Chair: Grace van der Gugten
9:00 AM
9:20 AM
Bioactive Lipids as Pharmacodynamic Biomarkers of Mast Cell Activity in the Clinic
Veronica Anania
Genentech, Inc.
Posttranslationally Modified Proteins as New Targets for Clinical MS Protein Tests
Dobrin Nedelkov
Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University
Accuracy of Volumetric Absorptive Microsampling for Quantification of Protein Biomarkers
Irene van den Broek
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
CTP Synthase Activity Assay by LC-MS/MS in the Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mode
Anne-Claire Boschat
Institut Imagine
MALDI Imaging: A Promising Tool in Elucidating the Pathophysiology of Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage
Audrey Jongen
Maastricht University Medical Centre
Understanding Matrix Effects Experiments
Grace van der Gugten
St Paul's Hospital
9:20 AM
9:40 AM
Worldwide Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Storage Diseases by Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Michael Gelb
Univ. of Washington
Development and Validation of an Immunoaffinity LC-MS Method to Active and Total B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Human Plasma
Michael Lassman
Merck & Co
Quantification of Retinol-Binding Protein (RBP) in Human Serum by LC-MSMS: Considerations for Development and Validation
Anna Merrill
University of Washington
Development and Validation of a LC-MS/MS Method for L-Arginine (ARG) and Asymmetric/Symmetric Dimethylarginine (ADMA/SDMA)
Xander van Wijk
University of California, San Francisco
Rapid Cancer Diagnosis from Fine Needle Aspirate and Touch Imprint Biopsies by Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry
Livia Schiavinato Eberlin
The University of Texas at Austin
Method Development Matrix Effects Case Study
Autumn Breaud
Johns Hopkins University
9:40 AM
10:00 AM
Opportunities for Clinical Metabolomic Analysis of Tissue using Liquid Microjunction Surface Analysis
Timothy Garrett
University of Florida
Profiling B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Cleavage Proteoforms in Human Plasma by CE-MS
Shenyan Zhang
Cedars Sinai Medical Center
Dried Blood Spot Screening for Primary Immunodeficiencies using Immuno-SRM
Sunhee Jung
Seattle Children
UPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Disease-Specific Oligosaccharides for Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Diagnosis and Potential Treatment Monitoring
Rongrong Huang
Greenwood Genetic Center
Simulated Breast Cancer Resection Margin Assessment using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) with Histology Correlation
Nicole Morse
Queen's University
Matrix Effects: An Interactive Session
Grace van der Gugten
St. Paul’s Hospital

Problem Set (PDF)
10:00 AM
11:00 AM
POSTER SESSION
@ Exhibit Hall

Stroll on over to the Exhibit Hall for some coffee, tea, pastries and fruit.

Chat with the Exhibitors and get ready for the Plenary in the Exhibit Hall at 11:00 AM.

Plenary Lecture Series
@ Exhibit Hall (Oasis)
Chair: Charity Aiken
11:00 AM
11:45 AM
A Defined “Structure” for the Immune System that Reflects Immune Surveillance & Mechanistic Processes
Garry Nolan
Stanford University School of Medicine
High parameter single cell analysis has driven deep understanding of immune processes. Using a next-generation single-cell “mass cytometry” platform we quantify surface and cytokine or drug responsive indices of kinase target with 45 or more parameter analysis (e.g. 45 antibodies, viability, nucleic acid content, and relative cell size). Similarly, we have developed two advanced technologies that enable deep phenotyping of solid tissue in both fresh frozen and FFPE formats (50 – 100 markers). We have recently extended this parameterization to mRNA with the capability to measure down to 5 molecules per cell in combination with any other set of previously created markers.

I will present evidence of deep internal order in immune functionality demonstrating that differentiation and immune activities have evolved with a definable “shape”. This shape is altered during immune surveillance and “imprinted” during, and after, pathogen attack, traumatic injury, or auto-immune disease. Hierarchies of functionally defined trans-cellular modules are observed that can be used for mechanistic and clinical insights. I will focus upon pathogen attack, traumatic surgical intervention in human, and auto-immune processes for the presentation.
11:45 AM
12:00 PM
POSTER AWARDS
@ Exhibit Hall
Chair: Charity Aiken
Join us in congratulating the winners of the poster contest.
12:00 PM
12:45 PM
POSTER AWARD GRAND ROUNDS
@ Exhibit Hall

Visit the award winning posters for a discussion led by a topic expert.
12:00 PM
1:30 PM
LUNCH
@ Exhibit Hall

Box Lunch to be provided in the Exhibit Hall.
1:30 PM
EXHIBITS CLOSED
@ Exhibit Hall
1:30 PM
2:00 PM

CORPORATE WORKSHOPS (PM)

Neoteryx
Rm 1: Mojave

Microsampling Workshop | A Look at the Implementation of Dried Blood Microsampling from Convenient Patient Collection to Reliable, Automated Specimen Processing
Thierry Dervieux, PharmD., PhD., DABCC, CSO & Medical Director, Exagen Diagnostics & Julia Colletti, Scientist, Mass Spectrometry R&D, Quest Diagnostics

Pre-Register

Examine how two clinical diagnostic organizations have implemented volumetric absorptive microsampling (VAMS™) to capitalize on patient benefits of improved comfort from a fingerstick and increased convenience of at-home collection. Furthermore, the presenters will share how they generate results similar to those from venous blood, resolve the volumetric hematocrit assay bias, and fully automate the assay on a Hamilton® STAR™ workstation.

(1) Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Disease Modifiers in Rheumatic Diseases: Implementation Using VAMS Collection Method | Exagen Diagnostics

(2) Automated Method for the Sample Preparation and LC-MS/MS Analysis of Steroids in Dried Blood using Mitra Microsampling Devices | Quest Diagnostics

Agilent Technologies
Rm 2: Catalina

A robust triple-quadrupole ion-paired reverse-phase metabolomics workflow for turn-key analysis of central metabolic pathways.
Adam Rosebrock

Pre-Register

Mass-spectrometry analysis of endogenous metabolites, metabolomics, has emerged as a powerful tool to directly examine biochemical state. Advances in LC separation and mass spectrometry instrumentation permit efficient and sensitive separation and detection, enabling the parallel analysis of hundreds of compounds in a single run. Despite the promise of metabolomic analysis, the wide chemical diversity of analytes presents many challenges for method development and a resulting hurdle for setting up metabolic assays. For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Waters
Rm 3: Madera

Matrix Effects and Matrix Affects: The Impact of Different Sample Matrices on Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Analysis
Jonathan Danaceau, Ph.D, Principal Applications Chemist, Waters Corporation

This workshop will discuss many challenges that analysts face when working with a variety of complex sample matrices. The analysis of 3 compounds will be described with an emphasis on how the sample pre-treatment, SPE protocols and chromatographic methods must change depending on the sample matrix. Four different sample matrices will be used including urine, whole blood, plasma and oral fluids. Suggestions will also be provided for method developers concerned with these types of matrices.

Biognosys
Rm 4: Pasadena

Best of both worlds: combining quantitative targeted proteomics with high-content discovery proteomics
Fadi Abdi, Florian Marty

Biognosys is the leading next generation proteomics company. Using our proprietary HRM-MS approach we have recently identified over 9`000 proteins in a single shot DIA measurement of mouse cerebellum tissue. Here, we present a workflow that combines the quantitative power of stable isotope-labelled reference peptides with the discovery potential of HRM-MS. Using the reference peptides from our PlasmaDive and PlasmaDeepDive panels we have obtained absolute quantitative information of 173 proteins in un-depleted plasma. Additionally, over 400 plasma proteins were identified in a single shot experiment and can be quantified over a large cohort with high reproducibility. Further, the quantification values obtained for the SIS peptides can be used to extrapolate the absolute quantitative values of all proteins identified.

MilliporeSigma
Rm 5: Sierra

Quantitation of Proteins and Antibodies In Serum by LC-MS/MS Using Full-Length Stable Isotope Labeled Internal Standards and Certified Reference Materials
Kevin Ray and Uma Sreenivasan

LC-MS/MS is becoming a powerful tool for the quantitation of proteins in plasma. Such methods typically utilize stable isotope labeled (SIL) peptide internal standards. For more accurate quantitation, a full-length SIL protein can be added to the sample at the initial stage of the assay workflow. To enable this approach, we have developed SIL monoclonal antibodies, including SIL-Infliximab, as well as SIL versions of clinically-relevant human proteins, such as Thyroglobulin. We will demonstrate that the use of a SIL proteins and SILuMAB internal standards allows for more accurate and rapid quantitation of therapeutic antibodies and human protein biomarkers in plasma by LC-MS/MS. We will also discuss development and certification of proteins as Certified Reference Materials for accurate quantitation in clinical applications.

2:00 PM
2:15 PM
COFFEE BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 6
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
Insights into Antimicrobial Resistance
Chair: Susan Butler-Wu
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Calcium Metabolism
Chair: Andy Hoofnagle
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Proteomics and 'The Emperor of All Maladies'
Chair: Anna Merrill
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Talks Merged with Track 5
Chair: TBA
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Metabolism and Drugs
Chair: Zsolt Bodai
Track 6
SmokeTree
Optimizing Data Analysis
Chair: Josh Hayden
2:15 PM
2:35 PM
In-Depth Analysis of a Resilient Multi-Drug Resistant Pathogen, KPC27, using High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics Approach
Yanbao Yu
J. Craig Venter Institute
A New Look at Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP): Possible Role for Calcium Regulation in Brain
Mark Kushnir
ARUP Institute for Clinical & Experimental Pathology
Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of HER2 Expression in the Selection of Gastric Cancer Patients for Trastuzumab Treatment
Eunkyung An
NantOmics
Track Merged -->Exploring the Limits of DESI and MALDI MSI for Metabolite Identification
Andreas Dannhorn
Imperial College London
Challenges in Mass Spectrometry Data Analysis … Why You Can’t Just Weigh Out Your Peaks Anymore
Joshua Hayden
Weill Cornell Medical College
2:35 PM
2:55 PM
Identification of Altered Lipidome in Lipopeptide-Resistant Bacteria by HILIC-IM-MS
Kelly Hines
University of Washington
Separation of Multiple Vitamin D Metabolites using Ultra-Performance Convergence Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Carl Jenkinson
IMSR, University of Birmingham
Prostate Specific Antigen Glycomics Assay: Towards a More Specific Tool for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer
Guinevere S.M. Kammeijer
Leiden University Medical Center
Track Merged -->Application of Imaging Mass Spectrometry to Assess Ocular Drug Transit
Kerri Grove
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
Clinical Mass Spectrometry Data Flow: Friend or Foe? Understanding Your Information Technology Options
Patrick Mathias
University of Washington
2:55 PM
3:15 PM
Simultaneous Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance Determination of Pathogenic Enterococci by Phage-based MALDI-TOF MS
Nicholas Saichek
Colorado School of Mines
A Multiplexed Assay to Identify CYP24A1 Deficiency
Andy Hoofnagle
University of Washington
Proteogenomics of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma
John Koomen
Moffitt Cancer Center
Track Merged -->Whole Body Skin Imagings of Medicines and Metabolites by Thermal Desorption-Electrospray Ionization/Mass Spectrometry
Jentaie Shiea
National Sun Yat-Sen University
Strategies for Human-Proofing High-Throughput Data Analysis
Julia Drees
Kaiser Permanente Regional Laboratories
3:15 PM
3:30 PM
TEA-TIME BREAK
@ Renaissance Ballroom Foyer

Take a Break! :)
GENERAL SCIENTIFIC Session 7
Track 1
Rm 1: Mojave
New Technologies for Clinical Applications of Metabolomics
Chair: Robert Jansen
Track 2
Rm 2: Catalina
Assay Standardization II
Chair: Hubert Vesper
Track 3
Rm 3: Madera
Discovery Proteomics
Chair: William Slade
Track 4
Rm 4: Pasadena
Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
Chair: Brian Kelly
Track 5
Rm 5: Sierra
Closing Keynote - 45 min
Chair: Jeffrey Spraggins
Track 6
SmokeTree

Chair: TBA
3:30 PM
3:50 PM
Metabolomics Guided Systems Biology in Clinical Applications
Tao Huan
The Scripps Research Institute
Improved Diagnosis and Treatment of Patients Through Accurate and Standardized Estradiol Tests
Julianne Cook Botelho
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Proteome-based Mapping of Non-Serous Gynecological Tissue Specimens
Vathany Kulasingam
University Health Network
LC-MS/MS-based Drug Monitoring in Breast Milk: Understanding the Mechanism of Transport and Risk of Infant Exposure
Sarah Delaney
SickKids Hospital/University of Toronto
MALDI Imaging MS: Histology and Beyond
Kristina Schwamborn
Institute of Pathology
Track Closed
3:50 PM
4:10 PM
Ion Mobility/Mass Spectrometry for Metabolomics and Clinical Analysis
Richard Yost
University of Florida
The Path Toward Urine Albumin Standardization
Ashley Beasley Green
National Institute of Standards and Technology
A Computational Pipeline for Accurate and Reproducible Analysis of Peptides in Data Independent Acquisition MS Data: Application to Human Clinical Samples
Jarrett Egertson
University of Washington
Validation of a LC-MS/MS Assay for the Simultaneous Quantitation of 5 Azole Antifungals and 1 Active Metabolite
Adam McShane
Cleveland Clinic
4:10 PM
4:30 PM
Applicability of Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) in Uterine Cervical Pathology — a Proof of Principle Study
Menelaos Tzafetas
Imperial College London
Lipoprotein Sub-Class Composition, Size and Particle Number in Normal and Dyslipidemic Individuals Measured by Means of Quantitative LC-MS/MS Techniques
Zsuzsanna Kuklenyik
Centers for Disease Control
Elucidation of Novel Proteoforms of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) in Sporadic ALS Patients
Philip Loziuk
NC State University
Capillary Blood Collected on Volumetric Absorptive Micro Sampler for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Hydroxychloroquine
Ying Qu
Exagen Diagnostic, Inc.
4:30 PM
5:00 PM
PRE-DINNER COCKTAIL
@ Rocks Terrace (COLD/RAIN: Santa Rosa)

Have a drink and relax a bit while we get ready for the closing reception dinner.
5:00 PM
6:30 PM
BBQ COOKOUT & CLOSING RECEPTION
@ Rocks Terrace and Surroundings (COLD/RAIN: Rms 2-5 & Registration Foyer)

Dinner and Drinks with Hamburgers and Hotdogs! Yee haw! ;)
6:00 PM
10:00 PM
PALM SPRINGS VILLAGE FEST
@ Downtown Palm Springs

Village Fest
The Thursday night street fair featuring arts, crafts, food, and entertainment!
6:30 PM
8:00 PM
HOSPITALITY
@ Rocks Terrace OR Santa Rosa (if cold &or wet)

8:00 PM
CONFERENCE CLOSED
@ Renaissance